Location: Huntington New York

Silas Wood's sketch of the town of Huntington

Silas Wood’s sketch of the town of Huntington, L.I.

Silas Wood’s sketch of the town of Huntington, L.I. is a small manuscript of 63 pages which provides an authoritative look at the early history of Huntington New York, from its first settlement to the end of the American revolution. Particularly fascinating to our Native American researchers is the history of the early interaction with the Matinecoes, the Massapeags, and the Secataugs.

Will of Thomas Jones, – 1669

THOMAS JONES, Huntington, L. I. “His will is that his three youngest sons may have 20 shillings each.” Leaves same sum to “my eldest sons. To daughter Martha, £10. “To my eldest son Thomas my best cloak. To my son John my watch,” and make my wife executrix. February 16, 1669. LIBER 1-2, page 72 Witnesses, Samuel Titus, Thomas Powell. Sworn to by witnesses, February 26, 1669. Jonas Wood. Proved at Court of Sessions held at Southampton, March 2, 1669, and his wife Katharine Jones, was confirmed as executrix. Henry Pierson, Clerk. Inventory, £195. House and Lands, £35. Samuel Titus,

Will of Thomas Wicks, – 1670

THOMAS WICKS, Huntington. Leaves to wife (not named) the use of one third of “accommodations I now live on,” for life, then to son John. To son Thomas the lot that was John Lewis’, and “a lot of meadow I bought of Noah Rogers,” also “Nayles to fitt up his house.” To son John “the other two thirds of accommodations where I now live.” Legacies to daughters Rebecca and Martha and their children (not named). Rest to wife and “four of my children namely: John, Elizabeth, Mary and Sarah.” Makes Isaac Platt and Thomas Powell executors. July 3, 1670. Witnesses,

Will of James Naybor – 1671

JAMES NAYBOR, Huntington, “Cooper.” Leaves to youngest daughter, Martha, “my Great Trunk and best chest with linnen and woolen clothes.” “To my grandchild, Mercy, when 21, £10, to be raised out of my house in Boston,” which I leave to my five daughters, Mary, Sarah, Elizabeth, Rachel, and Martha. Makes his daughter Martha executrix, and Mr. Wm. Bartholemew and Goodman Sundall, both of Boston, executors in trust. “I desire Thomas Scudder and Joseph Bayley, of Hunttington, to be helpfull to my daughter Martha as executor.” Dated January 27, 1671. Witnesses, Matthew Owen, Peter Floyd, Joseph Bayley. Proved at Court of

Will of Thomas Brush – 1675

Whereas THOMAS BRUSH, late of Huntington, upon Long Island, died intestate.” His son Thomas is made administrator, September 10, 1675. “The apprizement of the inventory amounts to £306 12s., as returned to the Court of Sessions.” LIBER 1-2, page 120

Will of William Ludlum – 1655

WILLIAM LUDLAM, Southampton. Leaves to his son Anthony “all my housing and lands at the old ground,” and a £50 right of commonage in town of Southampton. Leaves to his son Joseph “my new dwelling-house with two acres of land adjoining, and thirty acres of land adjoining to the mill and mill pond, on the east side of the mill river; and a £50 right of commonage.” Leaves legacies to daughters Grace, Frances, and Mary, also to “eldest child of my son William,” “my son Henry’s child,” “my daughter Grace’s child,” and to “the eldest child of my danghter Frances.”

Bay, Bernice – Obituary

Bernice Wilson Bay, 87, of Huntington, New York and formerly of La Grande, died Friday, March 19, at Huntington Hospital. A Mass of Christian Burial will begin at 10 a.m. at Our Lady of the Valley Catholic Church. Payne Family Mortuary is in charge of arrangements. Mrs. Bay was born on October 5, 1911 to William and Myra (Hatfield) Wilson in La Grande. She lived in La Grande and Enterprise for many years after her marriage to Lawrence Bay in 1935. During World War II, she and her husband lived in Seattle, but they later returned to Oregon to rear

Matinecoc Tribe

Matinecoc Indians. An Algonquian tribe which formerly inhabited the northwest coast of Long Island, New York, from Newtown, Queens county, to Smithtown, Suffolk county. They had villages at Flushing, Glen Cove, Cold Spring, Huntington, and Cow Harbor, but even before the intrusion of the whites they had become greatly reduced, probably through wars with the Iroquois, to whom they paid tribute. In 1650 Secretary Van Tienhoven reported but 50 families left of this once important tribe. Ruttenber includes them in his Montauk group, which is about equivalent to Metoac; but the interrelationship of the tribes in the western part of