Fryeburg Maine

Grover Post

Grover Post, No. 126, was organized by sixteen veterans of Fryeburg and Lovell on Dec. 24, 1884. Wm. C. Towle was chosen first commander, Tobias L. Eastman and others completing the staff, the itemized list of which was burned in the recent fire. The membership increased until at one time there were sixty-nine members. For […]

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Pequawket Tribe

Pequawket Indians (a name of disputed etymology, the most probable rendering, according to Gerard, being ‘at the hole in the ground,’ from pekwakik). A tribe of the Abnaki confederacy, formerly living on the headwaters of Saco River and about Lovell’s Pond, in Carroll County, New Hampshire, and Oxford County, Maine. Their principal village, called Pequawket,

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The Sokokis Indians

Before the encroachment of pale faced settlers, the entire valley of the Saco and its tributaries was peopled by the numerous Sokokis Indians. These were considered the parent tribe of the Abenaki Nation, which at one time peopled the whole of Maine. One of the most eloquent and statesmanlike of their chiefs once said in

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Fryeburg Horse Railroad

This company was chartered in March 1887, for the purpose of establishing and maintaining a horse railroad in the village and to run to the Chautauqua grounds. It was at once organized and $5075 capital stock issued, which was taken by thirty stockholders. The road was installed and equipped that season, opened July 25, but

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Fryeburg Water Works

In 1882, the Fryeburg Water Co. was organized by local citizens under the direction of Dr. D. Lamson Lowell, for the purpose of installing a system for supplying pure water from Green Hill mountain in Conway. There a series of boiling springs was dammed back, forming a reservoir covering about an acre less than three

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Fryeburg Churches

Rev. Paul Coffin, D. D., of Buxton, visited this region in 1768, on a missionary journey “to Pigwacket” and was elaborately entertained at the mansion of Capt. Henry Young Brown and at the home of John Webster. At these and other places he delivered sermons, being the earliest ordained preacher, except Rev. Timothy Walker of

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Fryeburg Academy

The question of a free grammar school in Fryeburg was first agitated by Rev. Wm. Fessenden, D. D., the first gospel minister settled in town. Through his efforts such a school was established in 1791, and was held in a little building at the foot of Pine Hill where fifty pupils were gathered. The year

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The Maine Indians

Before the encroachment of pale faced settlers, the entire valley of the Saco and its tributaries was peopled by the numerous Sokokis Indians. These were considered the parent tribe of the Abenaki Nation, which at one time peopled the whole of Maine. One of the most eloquent and statesmanlike of their chiefs once said in

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