Location: Devonshire England

Walter Ballou

Ancestry of Walter Ballou of North Attleboro MA

Walter Ballou, one of the representative citizens and well-known jewelry manufacturers of North Attleboro, where for upward of a half century he has been a member of the jewelry manufacturing firm of R. Blackinton & Co., is a native of the State of Rhode Island, born in the town of Cumberland Feb. 20, 1835, son of Preston and Harriet M. (Brown) Ballou. The Ballou family is among the oldest and most distinguished of Rhode Island. Of Norman-French origin, it is descended from Gunebored Ballou, who was probably a marshal in the army of William the Conqueror and took part in the memorable battle of Hastings, 1066.

Everett Clinton Hall

Ancestors of Everett Clinton Hall of Brockton, MA

EVERETT CLINTON HALL, wholesale grocer at Brockton, is one of that thriving city’s enterprising and progressive young business men, one who by his own efforts has risen to a position of affluence through his energy and ability to take the initiative combined with natural-born business acumen. Mr. Hall is a descendant of several of the earliest settled families of this Commonwealth, numbering among his ancestors several of the country’s most noted Pilgrims, among these being John Alden and Priscilla Mullins. The Hall family ancestry following is given in chronological order.

Descendants of Leonard Crocker Couch of Taunton MA

COUCH (Taunton family). The family bearing this name at Taunton whose representative head is now Leonard Crocker Couch, Esq., who since boyhood has been a resident of the city, occupied in mechanical and business lines, and for years one of the substantial men and useful citizens of the community, is one of long and honorable standing in the neighboring State of Connecticut and of distinction in our country. And through its Taunton alliance of a generation ago – that of Maj. Gen. Darius Nash Couch, of Civil war fame, the father of the present Leonard Crocker Couch just alluded to

Biographical Sketch of Richard L. C. Isherwood

Richard L. C. Isherwood, junior member of the firm, was born in Gloucestershire, England, December 6, 1856. His father was an officer of the Queen’s Revenue during about fifteen years. He came with his parents to the United States at the age of fourteen years, after having received his education at Millbrook Collegiate Institute, Devonshire, England. He located first at Carrollton, Missouri, where he spent four years learning and working at the tinner’s trade. Came to Jamesport in 1875, and soon after entered into partnership with Mr. Miller. Mr. Isherwood was married in Jamesport, October 18, 1878, to Miss Mary

Lynmouth in Devonshire

History Gazetteer and Directory of Devonshire 1850

The History, Gazetteer and Directory of Devonshire 1850 provides a historical look at the county of Devonshire prior to 1850. Devonshire, the largest county in England, except Yorkshire, and the most westerly except Cornwall, ranked among the first in agricultural importance, and the sixth in amount of population. Occupying the whole breadth of the central portion of that great south-western peninsula of the British Island, which juts out between the Bristol and English Channels, and having more than 150 miles of sea coast, and some fine navigable rivers and broad estuaries, Devonshire was one of the most important maritime counties in the kingdom.

1850 Gazetteer of Yealmpton England

YEALMPTON, a large and respectable village, with many good houses, is pleasantly seated on a salubrious acclivity, overlooking the river Yealm, 7 miles E. by S. of Plymouth, and 5½ miles W. of Modbury. It is on the high road to Kingsbridge, &c., and about a mile below it the Yealm spreads into a broad estuary. It has a great cattle market on the fourth Wednesday of every month, and is noted for the social and friendly intercourse of its inhabitants. Petty Sessions are held here every third Monday, by the magistrates of Ermington and Plympton Division, to whom Mr.

1850 Gazetteer of Woodleigh England

WOODLEIGH, which gives name to a deanery, is a small village, in a healthy and elevated situation, on the east side of the Aven valley, 3½ miles N. of Kingsbridge. Its parish contains 269 souls, and 2319 acres of land, including the hamlets of Priston and Hendham. The manor belonged at an early period to the Damarells, but it now belongs – 3/8ths to J. B. Swete, Esq., 1/8th to the heirs of F. Wise, Esq., ¼ to the heirs of Mrs. S. Edmonds, and ¼ to the heirs of Mrs. E. Netherton. the chief owners of the soil are

1850 Gazetteer of Wembury England

WEMBURY, a scattered village near the sea cliffs between Plymouth Sound and the mouth of the Yealm, 6 miles S.E. by S. of Plymouth, has in its parish 616 souls and 3670 acres of land, including the hamlets of Knighton and Down Thomas. The manor of Wembury belonged to Plympton Priory till the dissolution, and afterwards passed to various families. In the 16th century it belonged to Sir John Hele, sergeant at law, who built here a magnificent mansion, at the cost of £20,000, and enclosed a park, which had a salt water lake, supplied by the tides. After his

1850 Gazetteer of Ugborough England

UGBOROUGH is a neat and pleasant village, on the slopes of an eminence, surrounded by higher hills, 2½ miles E. of Ivybridge, and N.N.E. of Modbury, and 1½ mile S.W. of Kingsbridge Road Station. Its parish contains 1532 souls, and 8659 acres of land, generally fertile, and extending westward to the river Erme. It includes several handsome mansions, and many respectable farm-houses, and the small hamlets of Ludbrooke, Cheston, Nilham, Wrangaton, Fileham, and part of Ivybridge. There is a conduit in the centre of the village, and the church stands on the crown of the hill, which commands delightful views.

1850 Gazetteer of Totnes England

TOTNES, an ancient borough and market town, which retains some portions of its once formidable castle, and gives name to an archdeaconry and deanery, to a large union, and to county court and polling districts; is picturesquely seated on the western bank of the navigable river Dart, opposite the suburb of Bridgetown, 10 miles N.W. by W. of Dartmouth, 22 miles S. by W. of Exeter, 22 miles E. by N. of Plymouth, 9 miles W.S.W. of Torquay, and 194 miles W.S.W. of London. It has a station on the South Devon Railway. The Dart is navigable to it for