Barbour County AL

Native American History of Barbour County, Alabama

Barbour County is located in the southeast corner of Alabama, immediately west of the Chattahoochee River and the State of Georgia. The county seat is Clayton. The county is named after Jame Barbour, a popular Virginia governor and U. S. Senator.  As Secretary of War, Barbour successfully negotiated the removal of the Creek Nation from …

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Barbour County, Alabama Census Records

Barbour County was formed in 1832 from the Creek cession and Pike County. Pike County, Alabama Census Records 1840 Barbour County, Alabama Census Free 1840 Census Form for your Research Hosted at Ancestry.com – Ancestry Free Trial  1840 Barbour County, Census (images and index) $ 1810-1890 Accelerated Indexing Systems $ Hosted at Census Guide 1840 …

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Sawokli Indians

Sawokli Tribe: Possibly meaning “raccoon people,” in the Hitchiti language, and, while this is not absolutely certain, the okli undoubtedly means “people.” Sawokli Connections. The Sawokli belonged to the Muskhogean linguistic stock and to the subdivision called Atcik-hata. (See Apalachicola.) Sawokli Location. The best known historic location was on Chattahoochee River in the northeastern part …

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Biography of Judge James P. Wood

Integrity, intelligence and system are qualities which will advance the interests of any man or any profession, and will tend to the prosperity to which all aspire. The life of Judge James P. Wood in the professional arena has been characterized by intelligence, integrity, sound judgment and persevering industry. He is one of Cleburne County’s …

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Barbour County, Alabama Cemetery Records

Below is a complete listing of all available online Barbour County Alabama cemeteries, with links to multiple cemetery transcriptions, gravestone photos, tombstone photos, official records, etc. Most of these cemetery listings are complete indices at the time of transcription, however, in some cases we list the listing when it is only a partial listing. Following …

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Alabama Mortality Census Records

The 1850, 1860, 1870, 1880, and 1885 censuses included inquiries about persons who had died in the twelve months immediately preceding the enumeration. The 1850, 1960, 1870, and 1880 mortality census for Alabama all survived. Mortality schedules list deaths from 1 June through 31 May of 1849–50, 1859–60, 1869–70, 1879–80, and 1884–85. They provide nationwide, state-by-state death registers that predate the recording of vital statistics in most states. While deaths are under-reported, the mortality schedules remain an invaluable source of information.

Alabama Funeral Home Records

This page links to known Alabama Funeral Records whether they be available online or offline. Funeral records are an invaluable source of genealogical information that can provide insight into the lives and deaths of our ancestors. They offer a wealth of details on the deceased and their family, including their names, ages, dates of death, causes of death, and other key information. While funeral records can be found in a variety of places, genealogists must be careful when interpreting the information they contain, paying close attention to accuracy and cultural context. By using funeral records in their research, genealogists can gain a deeper understanding of their ancestors and build a more complete picture of their family history.

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