Collection: People of One Fire

Native American History of Quitman County, Georgia

Quitman County is named after General John A. Quitman, a U.S. Army officer in the Mexican War and governor of Mississippi. The county seat of Quitman County is the town of Georgetown. Quitman County is bounded on the north by Chattahoochee County, GA. On the south, it is bordered by Randolph County, GA. The county’s western boundaries are formed by the Chattahoochee River, the Alabama State Line, Barbour County, AL and Russell County, AL. On the east, it is bordered by Webster County, GA. Geology and hydrology Quitman County is located in the Upper Gulf Coastal Plain. In most areas

Native American History of Oconee County, Georgia

Oconee County is located in northeastern Georgia. Its county seat is Watkinsville. It is named after the Oconee River, which was named after the Okonee branch of the Creek Indians. To the north of Oconee is Clarke County. It is bounded on the east by Oglethorpe County. Walton County forms its western boundary, while Greene defines its southeastern boundary and Morgan County adjoins Oconee on the south. Geology and Hydrology The entire county is in Georgia’s Piedmont, which was originally an ancient mountain range that has been leveled through the eons. This region is underlain by igneous and metamorphic rocks.

Native American History of Twiggs County, Georgia

Twiggs County is located in central Georgia and is part of the Macon, GA Metropolitan Statistical Area (MSA.) It is named after General John Twiggs (1781 -1820) – a leader of the Georgia Militia during the American Revolution. Its county seat is Jeffersonville. Twiggs is bordered on the northeast side by Wilkinson County and the northwest by Bibb and Jones Counties. Laurens County forms its southeastern boundary. Bleckley County forms its southern boundary, while Houston County forms its southwestern boundary. One of the larger Native American town sites in Georgia is located in Twiggs County. Labeled today by archaeologists as

Native American History of Polk County, Georgia

Polk County is located in northwest Georgia. It was named after James K. Polk, 11th president of the United States. The county seat is Cedartown. Polk County is bounded on the north by Floyd County, GA and on the northeast by Bartow County, GA. On the south it adjoins Haralson County, GA. On the west, it is bordered by Cherokee County, Alabama and on the southwest by Cleburne County, Alabama. Geology and hydrology Most of Polk County is located in the Ridge and Valley geological region, which is characterized by multiple strata of Paleozoic sedimentary rocks deposited when eastern North

Native American History of Pickens County, Georgia

Pickens County located in northern Georgia. It is part of the Atlanta Standard Metropolitan Statistical Area (SMSA.) Its county seat is Jasper. It is named after Colonel Andrew Pickens, who commanded Patriot units in one of the last battles of the Revolutionary War, which was fought in Pickens county. Pickens County is bordered on the north by Gilmer County and the east by Dawson County. Gordon County adjoins Pickens on its western side. Cherokee County forms its southern boundary. Bartow County forms a relatively short section of Pickens’ southwest boundary. Geology and hydrology Pickens County contains sections of the Blue

Native American History of Paulding County, Georgia

Paulding County is located in west central Georgia and is part of the Atlanta Standard Metropolitan Statistical Area (SMSA.) It was named after Revolutionary militiaman John Paulding (1758-1818) who led a party of three young farmers in the capture of Major John Andre. Andre was carrying secret papers to traitor, Gen. Benedict Arnold. Paulding refused a bribe from Andre and turned him into George Washington’s headquarters; thus saving Fortress West Point. The county seat of Paulding County is Dallas. Paulding County is bounded on the north by Bartow County. On the east, it adjoins Cobb County. On the southeast it

Native American History of Newton County, Georgia

Newton County located in northern Georgia and is part of the Atlanta Standard Metropolitan Statistical Area (SMSA.) Its name honors Sgt. John Newton, a hero of the American Revolution. The county seat is Covington. Newton County is bordered on the north by Walton County. Morgan County adjoins it on the east while Jasper County adjoins it on the Southeast. Butts County is located to the south. Henry County forms the southwestern border, while Rockdale County forms the northwest border. Geology and hydrology Newton County was located in the Piedmont geological region, which is characterized by underlying rock strata of igneous

Native American History of Muscogee County, Georgia

Muscogee County is located in west central Georgia and is part of the Columbus, GA Standard Metropolitan Statistical Area. It was named after the Muscogee branch of the Creek Indians. Muscogee-speaking towns took a leading role in the formation of the People of One Fire or Creek Confederacy during the late 1600s and early 1700s. However, the word “Muscogee” did not appear on British and American maps until the late 1700s. Muscogee is the English version of the Native American word Mvskoke (Ma(hs-ko–ke-) which means Medicinal Herb People in the Creek language. Several references state that the word is of

Native American History of Monroe County, Georgia

Monroe County is located in central Georgia and is part of the Macon, GA Metropolitan Statistical Area (MSA.) It is named after President James Monroe of Virginia (April 28, 1758 – July 4, 1831.) Its county seat is Forsyth. Monroe County for several years became tourist destination after the popular movie, “Fried Green Tomatoes,” was filmed at the village of Juliette in 1991. Monroe County is bounded on the north by Butts County and the northeast by Jasper County. Jones County is located to the east, while Bibb County forms its southeastern boundary. Crawford County forms a section of its

Native American History of Milton County, Georgia

Milton County was located in northern Georgia. As part now of Fulton County, all of old Milton County is part of the Atlanta Standard Metropolitan Statistical Area (SMSA.) Its county seat was Alpharetta prior to the annexation of Milton and Campbell Counties by Fulton County in 1932. In 1932 Milton County (on the north) and Campbell County (on the south,) merged with Fulton County. Cobb County ceded the City of Roswell and a section of land along Wileo Creek to Fulton, in order to make the original section of Milton contiguous with Milton. The Native American histories of Campbell, Fulton