People of One Fire

Thornton, Richard. People of One Fire. Web. Georgia. 2010-2013. Digital Rights Copyright 2010-2013 by AccessGenealogy.com.

Native American History of Butts County, Georgia

Butts County is located in central Georgia and is part of the Atlanta Metropolitan Statistical Area (SMSA.) It is named after Captain Samuel Butts, who was killed in action during the Creek Civil War (Redstick War.) Its county seat is Jackson. Captain Butts commanded a militia company in the First Brigade of the Georgia Militia, …

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Native American History of Bleckley County, Georgia

Bleckley County is located in central Georgia.  It is named after Edward Logan Bleckley (1827 – 1907) – a lawyer and Chief Justice of the Georgia Supreme Court.  Its county seat is Cochran.  Bleckley is the location of the nation’s oldest two year public college, Middle Georgia College. Bleckley County is bordered on the north …

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Native American History of Bartow County, Georgia

Bartow County located in northwest Georgia.  It is part of the Atlanta Standard Metropolitan Statistical Area (SMSA.)  Its county seat is Cartersville.   Bartow is named after Colonial Francis S. Bartow, a Confederate officer who was killed in the First Battle of Manassas.  Prior to the Civil War, it was named Cass County in honor of …

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Native American History of Jackson County, Florida

Native American History of Jackson County, FL through 1800 AD Jackson County is located in northwestern Florida.  Its northern boundary is the Alabama line. Its eastern boundary is the Chattahoochee River and the southwestern tip of Georgia.  To the west is Holmes County, FL and the south, is Calhoun County, FL.  The Chipola River flows …

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Native American History of Houston County, Alabama

Houston County is located in the southeast corner of Alabama, immediately west of the Chattahoochee River and the State of Georgia. The southern boundary of the county is the Florida state line. It is named after a governor of Alabama, William Smith Houston. The county seat is Dothan. To the north is Henry County, AL.   …

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Native American History of Wakulla County, Florida

Wakulla County is located in northwestern Florida. It was named after the Creek-Seminole pronunciation of a Native American word, Guacara, The county seat and largest city in the county is Crawfordville.  Its northern boundary is Leon County, FL. Its northern boundary is Leon County, FL.  To the east is Jefferson County, FL; to the west …

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Native American History of Walton County, Florida

Walton County is located in northwestern Florida and stretches between the Alabama State Line and Gulf of Mexico.   The county seat and largest city in the county is DeFuniak Springs.  Its northwestern boundary is Covington County, AL. Its northeastern boundary is Geneva County, AL.  To the east is Holmes and Washington Counties, FL; to the …

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Native American History of Russell County, Alabama

In 1832 the Treaty of Cusseta transferred the lands of the Creek Confederacy to the United States.  This territory included what is now Russell County. Although most Alabamans today probably assume that the Creek Indians are an ancient, indigenous ethnic group, that once occupied all or most of their state, the Creek Tribe, in fact, …

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Native American History of Henry County, Alabama

Henry County is located in the southeast corner of Alabama, immediately west of the Chattahoochee River and the State of Georgia. It is named after the Governor of Virginia during the American Revolution, Patrick Henry. The county seat is Abbeville. To the north is Barbour County, AL. On the northeast boundary is Clay County, GA …

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Native American History of Geneva County, Alabama

Geneva County is located in southeastern Alabama. When created by the Alabama legislature in 1868, a Walter H. Yonge, a native of Switzerland suggested that it be named after Geneva, Switzerland. Its county seat is also named Geneva. It is bordered on the south by Holmes County, FL and on the southwest by Walton County, …

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Native American History of Barbour County, Alabama

Barbour County is located in the southeast corner of Alabama, immediately west of the Chattahoochee River and the State of Georgia. The county seat is Clayton. The county is named after Jame Barbour, a popular Virginia governor and U. S. Senator.  As Secretary of War, Barbour successfully negotiated the removal of the Creek Nation from …

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Brief History of the French and Indian War

Most histories of the French and Indian War make little mention of events in the Southeast during this period.  The primary reason is that European armies did not battle each other in the South. The bulk of the bloodshed in the Southeast occurred in battles between colonial militias and Great Britain’s former ally, the Cherokees. …

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Incessant Warfare

What is seldom understood by the general public, and even some historians, is that the ethnic pattern of the Southeast changed starkly between 1700 and 1776. Even the names of rivers changed to reflect socioeconomic changes. The Tennessee River was originally known as the Calimaco River in the 1600s, which is Itza Maya for “Throne …

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Fort Toulouse, the Chitimachas and the Natchez Wars

Another war between England and France began in 1718 – the War of the Quadruple Alliance. The French had succeeded in surrounding the British colonies in North America, except for the boundary with Florida.  France seemed poised to have most of the Southeastern Indians as allies.  These advanced Native American provinces represented the densest indigenous …

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Native Uprisings Against the Carolinas (1711-17)

In 1957 University of Georgia archaeologists, under the leadership of Dr. Joseph Caldwell, were working on several archaeological sites on the tributaries of the Savannah River that were to be flooded by Lake Hartwell.  The best known of these town sites are Tugaloo and Chauga. Because they were last occupied by Lower Cherokees in the …

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Early Colonization of La Louisiane

During the late 1600s and early 1700s, English explorers and colonists primarily stayed within the Piedmont and Coastal Plain, east of the Blue Ridge Mountains. Meanwhile, anonymous French traders and trappers were exploring the rivers of the Upper South then reporting back information to French officials in Quebec. The combination of expeditions sponsored by the …

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