Collection: People of One Fire

Native American History of Laurens County, Georgia

Laurens County is in one of several regions of Georgia that contained advanced indigenous cultures that have received only cursory attention from the archaeology profession.  Future discoveries along the Lower Oconee River may radically change the understanding of the Southeast’s Pre-European history. Although this large county is composed of lands ceded by the Muskogee-Creek Confederacy to the United States in the late 1700s and early 1800s, true Muskogee-Creeks probably did not enter the region until the mid-to-late 18th century.  Even then, occupation was shared with other ethnic groups, who became political allies of the Muskogees in order to survive multiple

Native American History of Pulaski County, Georgia

Pulaski County is located in south-central Georgia. It is named after General Kazimierz Pulaski (1745 – 1780) – a lawyer and Chief Justice of the Georgia Supreme Court. Its county seat is Hawkinsville. Kazimierz Pulaski is considered one of the great heroes of the American Revolution. He was first an officer in a failed attempt to liberate Poland from Russia. He briefly fought on behalf of Turkey in the Russo-Turkish War. In 1777 he sailed to North America and joined the Continental Army. Soon thereafter he saved the life of General George Washington. With the blessings of Benjamin Franklin, the

Native American History of Barrow County, Georgia

Barrow County located in northern Georgia and is part of the Atlanta Standard Metropolitan Statistical Area (SMSA.) The county seat is Winder. The county is named after David Crenshaw Barrow Jr. (1852 –1929.) Barrow served as the chancellor of the University of Georgia in nearby Athens from 1906 until 1925. Barrow County is bordered on the north by Hall County. On the east is bordered by both Clarke and Jackson Counties. On the south it is bordered by Walton County and southeast by Oconee County. Gwinnett County forms its western boundary. The Oconee Rivers defines the boundary between Barrow and

Native American History of Lumpkin County, Georgia

Lumpkin County located in northern Georgia. It is part of the Atlanta Standard Metropolitan Statistical Area (SMSA.) Its county seat is Dahlonega. It is named after Wilson Lumpkin, a U.S. Congressman and governor of Georgia in the early 1800s. He was state Indian commissioner when the Creeks ceded tracts of land that eventually became much of the Atlanta Metropolitan Area and Cherokees ceded a tract of land that included the future territory of Lumpkin County. The original name of Atlanta was Marthasville, taken from the first name of Wilson Lumpkin’s daughter. Lumpkin County is best known for its historic association

Native American History of Jones County, Georgia

Jones County is located in central Georgia and is part of the Macon, GA Metropolitan Statistical Area (MSA.) It is named after U. S. Rep. James Jones of Georgia (c. 1769-1801.) Its county seat is Gray. Congressman Jones was born in Maryland, but moved to Georgia with his uncle. He was a member of the Georgia General Assembly from 1796 to1798. In 1798 he was elected as a Federalist to the Sixth U. S. Congress. He served from March 4, 1799 to January 11, 1801. He died in office on January 11, 1801, in Washington, D.C and is buried in

Native American History of Jasper County, Georgia

Jasper County is located in central Georgia and is part of the Atlanta Standard Metropolitan Statistical Area (SMSA.) It is named after Sergeant William Jasper, a German-American hero of the American Revolution, who was killed in action during the siege of Savannah in 1779. Its county seat is Monticello. Johann Wilhelm Gasper (1750-1779) arrived in Philadelphia in 1767. There a British official changed his name to William Jasper. After working as an indentured servant for a few years, he moved to South Carolina. He joined the South Carolina militia in order to earn enough money to bring his Pennsylvania girlfriend

Native American History of Houston County, Georgia

Houston County is located in central Georgia and is part of the Macon, GA Metropolitan Statistical Area (MSA.) It is named after American Revolutionary leader, John Houstoun (1744 –1796). The spelling of the county’s name was changed to its current form after his death. However, it is pronounced House-ton, not like the Texas city of the same name. Its county seat is Perry. John Houstoun was born in St. George’s parish near present-day Waynesboro. His father was a baronet (minor nobility) from Scotland and a successful planter. Houstoun was appointed to the Governor’s Council by Royal Governor James Wright, but

Native American History of Henry County, Georgia

Henry County is located in central Georgia and is part of the Atlanta Standard Metropolitan Statistical Area (SMSA.) It is named after Patrick Henry (1736–1799) – ardent patriot and twice governor of Virginia. Its county seat is McDonough. Henry is bounded on the north by Rockdale and DeKalb Counties. On the east Newton County forms its boundary. Clayton County forms its western boundary. Newton County forms its eastern boundary. Butts County is located to the southeast of Henry, while Spalding County is located to the southwest. Geology and hydrology Henry County is drained by tributaries of the Ocmulgee River. Most

Native American History of Haralson County, Georgia

Haralson County is located in west central Georgia and is part of the Atlanta Standard Metropolitan Statistical Area (SMSA.) It was named after Hugh Anderson Haralson, who was a planter, lawyer and United States Congressman from Lagrange, Georgia. The county seat is Buchanan. Haralson County is bounded on the north by Polk County, GA and on the northeast by Paulding County, GA. On the south it adjoins Carroll County, GA. On the west, it is bordered by Cleburne County, Alabama. Geology and hydrology Haralson County is located in the Piedmont geological region, which is characterized by underlying rock strata of

Native American History of Hall County, Georgia

Hall County located in northern Georgia. It is part of the Gainesville, GA Standard Metropolitan Statistical Area (SMSA.) Its county seat is Gainesville. It is named after Lyman Hall, one of Georgia’s three signers of the Declaration of Independence. Gainesville was known as the Poultry Capital of the World in the 1950s through the1970s. It was here in the 1930s that Jesse Jewell pioneered the modern vertically integrated poultry industry, making chicken an inexpensive meat, affordable to most families. Until that time, chicken was a food item often reserved for Sunday dinner. In the late 1950s the Jesse Jewell Company