Collection: Old Families of Southeastern Massachusetts

Old Families of Southeastern Massachusetts

Beal Genealogy of Abington Massachusetts

The Beal family of Abington, the head of which was the late George A. Beal, Esq., who for years was one of the leading men of the town, prominent in business and public affairs and useful and substantial in citizenship, is one of long and honorable standing in this section of the Commonwealth and is a branch of the earlier Weymouth family, where early appeared the immigrant settler. By the marriage of the late Mr. Beal into the Reed family, his posterity is doubly descended from the Puritan stock of the early Colonial period of Massachusetts. There follows in chronological order from the immigrant settler, John Beal, the genealogy of the particular Abington family of Beals alluded to.

Horace A. Lawton

Lawton Genealogy of New Bedford Massachusetts

The branch of the Lawton family so long resident in New Bedford, and in each generation active in public affairs, but recently represented by the late Charles H. and Horace A. Lawton, well known druggists, the former long prominent in the government of the town and an important factor in the financial and commercial life, is descended from George Lawton, a brother of Thomas and possibly of John also, all of Newport as early as 1638 or 1639. George and Thomas were among the twenty-eight signers of the Compact, April 30, 1639, for the formation of a “civil body politicke.” George Lawton was made a freeman in 1655; member of the Court of Trials, 1648; deputy, 1665-72-75-76-79-80; assistant, 1680-81-82-83-84-85-86-89-90. He and five other assistants, with the deputy governor, wrote a letter to their Majesties, William and Mary, congratulating them on their accession to the Crown, and informing them that since the deposition of Governor Andros the former government under the charter had been resumed. He seems to have been prominent in all the Colonial affairs of his time. He died Oct. 5, 1693, and was buried in his orchard at Portsmouth. He married Elizabeth Hazard, daughter of Thomas and Martha Hazard.

Old Families of Southeastern Massachusetts

Ancestry of William Bowers Moison Chace of Taunton Massachusetts

William Bowers Moison Chace, senior member of W. B. M. Chace & Co., real estate, insurance, stocks and bonds, prominently identified with manufacturing and financial concerns, his position won through his own energy, integrity and general worth, is a worthy representative of a family planted in America but a decade later than the landing of the Pilgrim Fathers. He was born in Somerset, Mass., Dec. 5, 1854, and is of the ninth generation of the family in the New World.

Old Families of Southeastern Massachusetts

Ancestry of Nathaniel Reynolds Packard, 2d of Brockton Massachusetts

Nathaniel Reynolds Packard, 2d, who belonged to the older school of shoe manufacturers in Brockton, and whose industry and integrity, coupled with his executive ability and iron determination, won him success in his undertakings, died at Cory Hill hospital, Boston, Nov. 6, 1908, aged seventy-five years. He was a descendant of Samuel Packard, the first of the name in America, who with his wife and child came from Windham, near Hingham, England, in the ship “Diligence,” of Ipswich, and settled first at Hingham, Mass., in 1638, thence removing to West Bridgewater, where he became one of the early settlers, and where he was a tavern-keeper

Old Families of Southeastern Massachusetts

Ancestry of Dr. Charles Richard Hunt

Dr. Charles Richard Hunt is descended on the paternal side from William Hunt, of Concord, and on the maternal side from Sir Thomas Hayward, one of the early settlers of Duxbury, Mass., both of Puritan families.

Elmer C. Packard

Ancestry of Elmer C. Packard of Brockton Massachusetts

For nearly two hundred and seventy-five years the Packard family has been one prominent and influential in New England, and it has become a most numerous family, too, many of whose members both at home and abroad have given a good account of themselves. Samuel Packard, the immigrant ancestor of this family, became one of the early settlers of the ancient town of Bridgewater, and all of the name who have gone from the Bridgewaters were probably descendants of his; in fact, nearly all of the name in this country can be traced to that place. The genealogical records following

Old Families of Southeastern Massachusetts

Washburn Genealogy of Bridgewater Massachusetts

John Washburn, first of the name here, was an early settler in New England, and was a resident of Duxbury, Mass., before 1632, in which year he had an action in court against Edward Doten. He was named in the assessment of taxes in 1633, and in 1634 bought a place from Edward Bonparse known as “Eagle’s Nest.” He and his two sons, John and Philip, were included with those able to bear arms in 1643. He and his son John were original proprietors of Bridgewater, and they with the son Philip settled in the town as early as 1665. He died in Bridgewater before 1670.

William Baylies

Baylies Genealogy of New Bedford Massachusetts

The Baylies family of America is descended from Nicholas Baylies, who appears on June 5, 1706, as a witness to the marriage of his son Thomas, and is described as “of the parish of Aloe-Church, County of Worcester.” He was a Quaker in his religious belief.Thomas Baylies, born in England in 1687, married June 5, 1706, Esther Sargeant, daughter of Thomas Sargeant, of Ffullford-Heath, in the parish of Soby-Hull, County of Warwick. He carried on iron-works in England, first at Colebrookdale, and afterward at some place on the Thames. With his son Nicholas and daughter Esther he came to Boston from London in June, 1737, then returned, and the year after brought over his wife and four daughters, two married daughters remaining in London. After living a short time in Cumberland, R. I., he “leased the industrial establishment on the Mumford river, where Whitinsville is now located, for twenty-one years at £34 a year. They produced or dealt in ‘pigg’ and ‘barr’ iron, nails, ‘ankonys’ and other merchandise; owned cattle and much other property. Their establishment was widely known as Baylies’ Refinery or Finery. The older son, Thomas, Jr., did not appear in this undertaking, but located at Taunton, Mass.” Thomas Baylies died at Uxbridge March 5, 1756. Both he and his wife were Quakers.

Old Families of Southeastern Massachusetts

Ancestry of Thomas Beatty Inness of Brockton Massachusetts

Thomas Beatty Inness, of Brockton, one of that city’s enterprising and progressive citizens, is a native of Pennsylvania, born at Pottsville March 4, 1848, only son of the late James A. and Mary Williams (Beatty) Inness, and a descendant of sturdy Scotch-Irish.

Job B. French

French Genealogy of Fall River Massachusetts

The Fall River French family here considered springs from the early Rehoboth family of the name, and it, as will be observed further on, according to Savage, perhaps from the Dorchester family. John French, the head of the Dorchester family and the immigrant ancestor, was a native of England, born in 1612. He had land granted him at what became Braintree for five heads Feb. 24, 1639-40. He was admitted to the church in the adjoining town of Dorchester, Jan. 27, 1642, and the births of his first two children are recorded in Dorchester. He became a freeman May 29, 1639. He was active and prominent among the early settlers. His son John was born Feb. 28, 1641.