Collection: Handbook of American Indians North of Mexico

Napochi Tribe

Napochi Indians. A tribe living near Coosa river, Alabama at war with the Coças (Creek) in 1560. They were probably a Muskhogean people, more nearly affiliated to the modern Choctaw.

Napissa Tribe

Napissa Indians (Choctaw: nanpisa, ‘spy,’ ‘sentinel’) A tribe mentioned in 1699 by Iberville as united with the Chickasaw living in villages adjoining those of the later, and speaking the same or a cognate language.  As they disappeared from history early in the 18th century, it is probably that they were absorbed by the Chickasaw, if indeed they were not a local division of the latter.

Mosopelea Tribe

Mosopelea Indians. A problematic tribe, first noted on Marquette’s map where “Monsoupelea” or “Monsoupera,” is marked as an Indian village on the east bank of the Mississippi some distance below the mouth of the Ohio.  In 1682 LaSalle found a Mosopela chief with 5 cabins of his people living with the Taensa, but whom they had been adopted after the destruction of their former village by some unknown enemy. Alternate Spellings: Mansoleas – Barcia, Ensayo, 261, 1723. Mansopela – Douay in Shea, Discovery, 222, 224 (note), 268, 1852. Mansopelea – Hennepin, Cont. of New Discov., 48a, 1698. Mausalea – McKenney

Biography of Captain Jack – Kintpuash

Kintpuash ‘having the water-brash’ – Gatschet; also spelled Keiutpoos, but commonly known as Captain Jack. A subchief of the Modoc on the Oregon-California border, and leader of the hostile element in the Modoc war of 1872-73. The Modoc, a warlike and aggressive offshoot front the Klamath tribe of south east Oregon, occupied the territory immediately to the south of the latter, extending across the California border and including the Lost River Country and the famous Lava-bed region. They had been particularly hostile to the whites up to 1864, when, under the head chief Sconchin, they made a treaty agreeing to

Lillooet Tribe

Lillooet Indians (‘wild onion’). One of the 4 principal Salish tribes in the interior of British Columbia, situated on Fraser River around the mouths of Cayoosh Creek and Bridge River, on Seton and Anderson Lakes, and southward from them to Harrison Lake. Pop. 978 in 1904. Bands: Anderson Lake Bridge River Cavoosh Creek (2) Douglas Enias Fountain Kanlax Lillooet (2) Mission Niciat Pemberton Meadows Schloss It is sometimes divided into the Lower Lillooet, including the Douglas and Pemberton Meadows bands, and the Upper Lillooet, including all the rest.

Kumbatuash Tribe

Kumbatuash Indians. The native name of the inhabitants of Kumbat, a rocky tract of land southwest of Tule or Rhett Lake, California, extending from the lake shore to the Lava beds. These people are a mixture of Klamath Lake and Modoc Indians, and are said to have separated from these after 1830. Alternate Spellings Cum-ba-twas – Meacham, Wigwam and Warpath, 577, 1875. Gumbatkni – Gatschet in Cont. N. A. Ethnol., II, pt. II, 160 1890. Kumbatkni – Ibid. Kumbatuash – Ibid. Kumbatuashkni – Ibid. Kum-batwash – Ibid., pt. I, XXXIV, 1890. Hock Indians – Meacham, op. cit., 010.

Jack Indians

Jack Indians. An unidentified tribe mentioned by Dobbs, who states that in 1731 they came to trade at the mouth of Albany River, Northwest Territory, Canada

Tamaroa Tribe

Tamaroa Indians. (Tamaroa – Illinois: Tamaro´wa, said to mean ‘cut tail,’ or, lit., ‘he has a cut tail,’ probably relating to some totemic animal, such as a bear or the wildcat; cognate with Abnaki tĕmaruwé. – Gerard.) A tribe of the Illinois Confederacy. In 1680 they occupied the country on both sides of the Mississippi about the mouths of the Illinois and Missouri Rivers. They were always friendly to the French, who made their village a stopping place on journeys between Canada and Louisiana. Their enemies were the Chickasaw, who attacked them continually, and the Shawnee. They disappeared as a

Ibitoupa Tribe

Ibitoupa Indians. A small tribe of unknown affinity, but the theory that they were connected with the Chickasaw has more arguments in its favor than any other. In 1699 they formed one of the villages mentioned by Iberville 1Margery, Déc., IV, 180, 1880 as situated on Yazoo River, Ibitoupa being near the upper end of the group between the Chaquesauma (Chakchiuma) and the Thysia (Tioux), according to the order named, which appears to be substantially correct, although Coxe 2Coxe, Carolana, 10, 1741 who omits Thysia, makes the Ibitoupa settlement expressly the uppermost of the series. The Ibitoupa and Chakchiuma, together

Puyallup Tribe

Puyallup Indians. An important Salish tribe on Puyallup River and Commencement Bay, west Washington. According to Gibbs, their designation is the Nisqualli name for the mouth of Puyallup River, but Evans 1Bancroft, Hist. Wash., 66, 1890 says the name means ‘shadow,’ from the dense shade of its forests. By treaty at Medicine Creek, Wash., Dec. 26, 1854, the Puyallup and other tribes at the head of Puget Sound ceded their lands to the United States and agreed to go upon a reservation set apart for them on the sound near Shenahnam Creek, Wash. In 1901 there were 536 on Puyallup