Handbook of American Indians North of Mexico

Hodge, Frederick Webb, Compiler. The Handbook of American Indians North of Mexico. Bureau of American Ethnology, Government Printing Office. 1906.

Kato Tribe

Kato Indians. A Kuneste tribe or band formerly living in Cahto and Long valleys, Mendocino County, California.  These were probably the people mentioned by McKee as occupying the second large valley of Eel River, numbering about 500 in 1851, and differing in language from the Pomo, a fact which has long been lost sight of.  …

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Kuneste Tribe

Kuneste Indians (Wailaki: ‘Indian’). The southernmost Athapascan group on the Pacific Coast, consisting of several tribes loosely or not at all connected politically, but speaking closely related dialects and possessing nearly the same culture. They occupied the greater part of Eel River basin, including the whole of Van Duzen Fork, the main Eel to within …

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Huchnom Tribe

Huchnom Indians. A division of the Yuki of northern California, speaking a dialect divergent from that of the Round Valley Indians.  They lived on South Eel river above its confluence with the middle fork of the Eel river, or in adjacent territories, and on the headwaters of Russian River in upper Potter valley. To the …

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Diegueños Tribe

Diegueños Indians. A collective name, probably in part synonymous with Comeya, applied by the Spaniards to Indians of the Yuman stock who formerly lived in and around San Diego, in California, whence the term; it included representatives of many tribes and has no proper ethic significance; never the less it is a firmly established name …

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Dakubetede Tribe

Dakubetede Indians. A group of Athapascan villages formerly on Applegate creek, Oregon.  The inhabitants spoke a dialect practically identical with that employed by the Taltushtuntede who lived on Gallice Creek not far from them.  They were intermarried with the Shasta, who, with the Takilman, were their neighbors.  With other insurgent bands they were removed to …

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Coanopa Tribe

Coanopa Indians. A tribe, apparently Yuman, residing probably on or in the vicinity of the lower Rio Colorado early in the 18th century. They visited Father Nino while he was among the Quigyuma and are mentioned by him in connection with the Cuchan (Yuma) and other tribes12 . Possibly the Cocopa. Venegas, <em>History of California</em>, …

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Cajuenche Tribe

Cajuenche Indians. A Yuman tribe speaking the Cocopa dialect and residing in 1775-76 on the east bank of the Rio Colorado below the mouth of the Gila, next to the Quigyuma, their rancherias extending south to about lat. 32° 33º and into central south California, about lat. 33° 08′, where they met the Comeya. At …

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Manso Tribe

Manso Indians (Span; ‘mild’) A former sedentary tribe on the Mexican frontier, near El Paso, Tex., who, before the coming of the Spaniards, had changed their former solid mode of building for habitations constructed of reeds and wood. Their mode of government and system of kinship were found to be the same as those of …

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Clatsop Tribe

Clatsop Indians. A Chinookan tribe formerly about Creek Adams on the south side of the Columbia River and extending up the river as far as Tongue Point and south along the coast to Tillamook Head, Oregon.

Cowlitz Tribe

Cowlitz Indians. A Salish tribe formerly on the river of the same name in south west Washington. Once numerous and powerful, they were said by Gibbs in 1853 to be insignificant, numbering with the Upper Chehalis, with whom they, were mingled, not more than 165. About 1887 there were 127 on Puyallup Reservation, Washington. They …

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Chehalis Tribe

Chehalis Indians. Chehalis actually refers to two distinct peoples. One group of tribes residing on the Chehalis River in Washington, another tribe, a sub-tribe of the Cowichan First Nation residing along the Harrison River in British Columbia. We provide both below.

Penobscot Tribe

Penobscot Indians (derived by Vetromile from the Pānnawānbskek, ‘it forks on the white rocks,’ or Penaubsket, ‘it flows on rocks’; Godfrey and Ballard practically agree with Vetromile, the name applying directly to the falls at Oldtown, but Ballard says it has also been rendered ‘rock land,’ from penops [penopsc] ‘rock,’ and cöt [ot] locative, applied …

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Passamaquoddy Tribe

Passamaquoddy Indians (Peskěděmakâdi ‘plenty of pollock.’) A small tribe belonging to the Abnaki confederacy, but speaking nearly the same dialect as the Malecite.  They formerly occupied all the region about Passamaquoddy bay and on the St. Croix river and Schoodic lake, on the boundary between Maine and New Brunswick.  Their principal village was Gunasquamekook, on …

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