Handbook of American Indians North of Mexico

Hodge, Frederick Webb, Compiler. The Handbook of American Indians North of Mexico. Bureau of American Ethnology, Government Printing Office. 1906.

Nanaimo Tribe

Nanaimo Indians, Nanaimo People, Nanaimo First Nation (contraction of Snanaímux). A Salish tribe, speaking the Cowichan dialect, living about Nanaimo Harbor, on the east coast of Vancouver Island and on Nanaimo Lake, British Columbia.  Population 161 in 1906. Their gentes are Anuenes, Koltsiowotl, Ksalokul, Tewethen, and Yesheken.

Nahane Tribe

Nahane Indians, Nahane People, Nahane First Nation (‘people of the west.’). An Athapascan division occupying the region of British Columbia and Yukon Territory between the Coast range and the Rocky mountains, from the north border of the Sekani, about 57° north, to that of the Kutchin tribes, about 65° north. It comprises the Tahltan and …

Nahane Tribe Read More »

Matchotic Tribe

Matchotic (‘bad inlet.’-Hewitt). A group of tribes of the Powhatan confederacy occupying. the country between Potomac and Rappahannock rivers down to about the middle of Richmond county, Virginia, comprising the Tauxenent, Potomac, Cuttatawomen, Pissasec, and Onawmanient. They numbered perhaps 400 warriors in 1608, but 60 years later, according to Jefferson, had become reduced to 60 …

Matchotic Tribe Read More »

Appomattoc Tribe

Appomattoc Indians. A tribe of the Powhatan confederacy formerly living on lower Appomattox River, Virginia. They had 60 warriors in 1608, and were of some importance as late as 1671, but were extinct by 1722. Their principal village, which bore the same name was on the site of Bermuda Hundred, Prince George County, was burned …

Appomattoc Tribe Read More »

Chickahominy Tribe

Chickahominy Indians (from K’chick-ahän-min’-nough, ‘course-pounded corn people.’ ‘hominy people’ Tooker; or from Tshi-ke(jäme(n, a place name meaning ‘swept,’ “cleared,’ and implying a clearing—Gerard). A tribe of the Powhatan confederacy, formerly living on Chickahominy River, Virginia. It was one of the most important tribes in Virginia, numbering 250 warriors, or perhaps 900 souls, in 1608, and …

Chickahominy Tribe Read More »

Arosaguntacook Tribe

Arosaguntacook Indians: A tribe of the Abnaki confederacy, formerly living in Androscoggin County, Maine. Their village, which bore the same name, was on Androscoggin River, probably near Lewiston. The various names used indiscriminately for the tribe and the river may be resolved into the forms Ammoscoggin and Arosaguntacook, which have received different interpretations, all seeming …

Arosaguntacook Tribe Read More »

Kainah Tribe

Kainah First Nation, Kainah Indians, Blood Indians (Ah-kai-nah, ‘many chiefs,’ from a-kai-im many , ni´-nah chiefs ). A division of the Siksika, or Blackfeet, now living on a reservation under the Blood agency in Alberta, Canada, between Belly and St Mary Rivers. The subtribes or bands are Ahkaiksumiks, Ahkaipokaks, Ahkptashiks, Ahkwonistsists, Anepo, Apikaiyiks, Aputpsikainah, Inuhksoyistamiks, …

Kainah Tribe Read More »

Temiscaming Tribe

Temiscaming Indians (from Nipissing Timikaming, with intrusive s due to Canadian French; sig. ‘in the deep water ‘, from timiw ‘it is deep’ , gaming ‘in the water’ ). A band of Algonkin, closely related to the Abittibi, formerly living about Temiscaming Lake, Quebec. They were friendly to the French, and rendered them valuable service …

Temiscaming Tribe Read More »

Siksika Tribe

Siksika Indians. A tribe of the Siksika confederacy (see below). They now (1905) live on a reservation in Alberta, Canada, on upper Bow River, and are officially known as the Running Rabbit and Yellow Horse bands. They were divided into the following subtribes or bands: Aisikstukiks, Apikaiyiks, Emi-tahpahksaiyiks, Motahtosiks, Puhksinahmahyiks, Saiyiks, Siksinokaks,Tsiniktsistsoyiks. Pop. 942 in …

Siksika Tribe Read More »

Malecite Tribe

Malecite Indians. Various explanations of this name have been given. According to Chamberlain it is from their Micmac name Malisit, broken talkers ; Tanner gives the form as Mahnesheets, meaning ‘slow tongues’; Baraga derives it through the Cree from mayisit or malisit, the ‘disfigured or ugly foot’; Lacombe1 agrees with Baraga and gives the etymology …

Malecite Tribe Read More »

Attacapan Family

Attacapan Family. A linguistic family consisting solely of the Attacapa tribe, although there is linguistic evidence of at least 2 dialects. Under this name were formerly comprised several bands settled in south Louisiana and northeast Texas. Although this designation was given them by their Choctaw neighbors on the east, these bands with one or two …

Attacapan Family Read More »

Armouchiquois Tribe

Armouchiquois Indians (apparently a French corruption of Alemousiski, ‘land of the little dog,’ from allum ‘dog’ ousis deminutive, ac or auk ‘land’, “for there wer many little dogs in the prairies of this territory.” –Maurault). The name given by the Abnaki to the country of the Indians of the New England coast south of Sacro …

Armouchiquois Tribe Read More »

Allakaweah Tribe

Allakaweah Indians (Al-la-ká’-we-áh, ‘Paunch Indians’) The name applied by a tribe which Lewis and Clark1 located on Yellowstone and Bighorn Rivers, Montana, with 800 warriors and 2,300 souls. This is exactly the country occupied at the same time by the Crows, and although these latter are mentioned as distinct, it is probably that they were …

Allakaweah Tribe Read More »

Agawam Tribe

Agawam Indians (Agawom) (fish-curing [place]), Hewitt. A name of frequent occurrence in south New England and on the Long Island, and by which was designated at least 3 Indian villages or tribes in Massachusetts. The most important was at Ipswich, Essex County, Massachusetts. The site was sold by the chief in 1638. Its jurisdiction included …

Agawam Tribe Read More »

Patwin Tribe

Patwin Indians (‘man,’ ‘person’). A name adopted by Powers to designate a division of the Copehan family. They occupied the area extending from Stony creek, Colusa County, to Suisun Bay, Solano County, California, and from Sacramento river to the boundary of the Kulanapan family on the west, but excluding the so-called Coyote Valley Indians on …

Patwin Tribe Read More »

Koyeti Tribe

Koyeti Indians. A Yokuts tribe formerly living in south central California, in the vicinity of Tule river and southward.  Mentioned in 1852 as friendly tribe on Paint (White) creek, and described as possessing unusual courage and intelligence.  They are entirely extinct.

Konomihu Tribe

Konomihu Indians. A subsidiary tribe of the Shasta, living at the forks of Salmon River, Siskiyou County, California, extending 7 miles up the south fork and 5 miles up the north fork.  Their language is very divergent from that of the main body of Shasta.

Miwok Tribe

Miwok Indians (‘man”) One of the two divisions of the Moquelumnan family in central California, the other being the Olamentke.  With a small exception in the west the Miwok occupied territory bounded on the north by Cosumnes River, on the east by the ridge of the Sierra Nevada, on the south by Fresno creek, and …

Miwok Tribe Read More »

Wishosk Tribe

Wishosk Indians. A small tribe, whose name Powell adopted for the Wishoskan linguistic family, on the coast of North California about Humboldt Bay. The word seems to be a misapplication of their own name for their Athapascan neighbors, Wishashk. Wiyot, which has sometimes been used as an equivalent, is therefore probably a better term than …

Wishosk Tribe Read More »

Mattole Tribe

Mattole Indians (Wishosk name) An Athapascan tribe whose principal settlements were along Bear and Mattole Rivers, California.  They resisted the white race more vigorously than the natives of this region generally did and suffered practical extermination in return.  They were gathered on a reservation near Creek Mendocino for a time and some of them were …

Mattole Tribe Read More »

Pin It on Pinterest

Scroll to Top