Search Results for: Cree

Words Constituting the Jargon

The number of words constituting the Jargon proper has been variously stated. Many formerly employed have become in great measure obsolete, while others have been locally introduced. Thus, at the Dalles of the Columbia, various terms are common which would not be intelligible at Astoria or on Puget Sound. In making the following selection, I have included all those which, on reference to a number of vocabularies, I have found current at any of these places, rejecting, on the other hand, such as individuals, partially acquainted with the native languages, have employed for their own convenience. The total number falls

Chinook to English Dictionary

Ah-ha, adv. Common to various tribes. Yes. Expression of simple assent. On Puget Sound, E-ÉH. Ah’n-kut-te, or Ahn-kot-tie, adv. Chinook, ANKUTTI. Formerly; before now. With the accent prolonged on the first syllable, a long time ago. Ex. Ahnkutte lakit sun, four days ago; Tenas ahnkutte, a little while since. Al-áh, interj. Expression of surprise. Ex. Alah mika chahko! ah, you’ve come! Al-kie, adv. Chinook, ALKEKH. Presently; in a little while; hold on; not so fast. Al’-ta , adv. Chinook, ALTAKH. Now; at the present time. A-mo’-te, n. Chinook, AMUTE; Clatsop, KLABOTÉ. The strawberry. An-áh , interj. An exclamation denoting pain,

Daniels, Norma Jeanne Mrs. – Obituary

Halfway, Baker County, Oregon Norma Jeanne Daniels, 84, a longtime Halfway resident, died Aug. 17, 2005, in Caldwell, Idaho. A graveside celebration of Jeanne’s life took place today at Pine Haven Cemetery in Halfway. Jeanne was born Jan. 31, 1921, and raised in Halfway, where she married “Danny” Daniels and had three children. After Danny’s death in 1953 she had to go to work and raise her children. She operated the Stockmans and Hells Canyon Cafes in Halfway for many years. After her mother’s death, she moved to Las Vegas in 1972 where she worked as a hostess in large

Brill, Edna V. Jacobs Mrs. – Obituary

Baker City, Oregon Edna V. Brill, 79, a longtime Baker City resident, died April 8, 2001, at St. Elizabeth Health Services. Her funeral will be at 2 p.m. Friday at Gray’s West & Co. Pioneer Chapel, 1500 Dewey Ave. Pastor Bill Cox of the McEwen Bible Fellowship will officiate. Vault interment will be in Mount Hope Cemetery. There will be a reception after the services at the Senior Center, 2810 Cedar St. Visitations will be from noon to 8 p.m. Thursday at Gray’s West & Co. Mrs. Brill was born on Jan. 5, 1922, at Baker City to Howard and

Biography of John Flett

JOHN FLETT. – Among the schemes of the Hudson’s Bay Company, in 1839 and 1840, to acquire occupancy and secure British title to the territory on the north side of the Columbia river, was an immigration to the Cowlitz and Nisqually Plains from the Selkirk settlement in the valley of the Red river of the North. It will be remembered that the Hudson’s Bay Company was present in the territory west of the Rocky Mountains by virtue of a license of trade from the British Crown, which precluded it from acquiring landed possessions. Its right was a mere tenancy for

Reorganization of the Judicial System after the Creation of Oregon Territory

Judge William Strong arrived by water in August, 1850, and Judge Nelson in April, 1851. On the same ship with Strong came General Edward Hamilton, territorial secretary, who subsequently took up his residence at Portland and became an active member of the bar there. He was associated for some years with Benjamin Stark, under the firm name, Hamilton & Stark. Judge Strong’s district was the Third and was wholly included within the present State of Washington, and he took up his residence at Cathlamet on the Columbia. Chief Justice Thomas Nelson had the first district, but when the controversy about

Oregon Indian Tribes

The history of the Oregon Indians was similar to that of the Indians of Washington. The coast tribes seem to have been affected little or not at all by the settlements of the Spaniards in California, and those of the interior were influenced only in slightly greater measure by them through the introduction of the horse. Nor were these tribes reached so extensively by the employees of the great fur companies. Contact with such advance agents of civilization was principally along the valley of the Columbia River, and Astoria will always be remembered as bearing witness to the transient attempts