Category: Wyoming

Wyoming WW2 NMCG Casualty List – T Surnames

TERRY, Jack Allen, Seaman 2c, USN. Parents, mr. and Mrs. Ducken Angus Terry, Box 493, Lander. THOMSON, John Scott, Aviation Radioman 3c, USN. Father, Mr. Andrew G. Thomson, Worland. THORNOCK, Ross Lavoy, Pfc., USMCR. Parents, Mr. and Mrs. Ross Thornock, Box 183, Cokeville. TURNER, Floyd E. Ensign, USNR. Parents, Mr. and Mrs. Earl A. Turner, 326 S. 4th St., Douglas.

Wyoming WW2 NMCG Casualty List – W Surnames

WALKER, Harry Edward, Electrician’s Mate 2c, USNR. Parents, Mr. and Mrs. Harry Vergal Walker, 102 7th St., Rawlins. WALKER, Harry Orville, Coxswain, USN. Aunt, Mrs. W. C. Wehr. 469 Park St., Sheridan. WALLENSTEIN, Richard Henry, Seaman 1c, USN. Father, Mr. Julius Cilas Wallenstein, 405 Davis St., Rawlins. WATT, Samuel Vance, Yeoman 1c, USNR. Father, Mr. Robert Archimedes Watt, Box 411, Riverton. WAY, Kenneth Karl, Seaman 1c, USNR. Parents, Mr. and Mrs. John Clements Way, Cody. WEAVER, William David, Watertender 2c, USN. Wife, Mrs. Shirley Alene Weaver, SY Ranch, Upton. WEBB, Jim F., Pfc., USMCR. Parents, Mr. and Mrs. William T.

Wyoming WW2 NMCG Casualty List – L Surnames

LANE, Edward Wallace, Coxswain, USN. Mother, Mrs. Lillian Louise Robertson, 115 W. 3d Ave., Cheyenne. LARSON, Everett William Motor Machinist’s Mate 1c, USNR. Father, Mr. Carl Joseph Larson, 717 Birch St., Rawlins. LARSON, Joseph Ernest, Fireman 1c, USN. Mother, Mrs. Carrie M. Larson, Rt. 5, Box 13, Douglas. LINTON, George Edward, Fireman 2c, USN. Father, Mr. Harry Graves Linton, Wheatland. LOFING, Raymond Dale, Seaman 2c, USNR. Wife, Mrs. Bernice A. Lofing, Acme. LOUDON, Leroy Edgar, Quartermanster 3c, USN. Parents, Mr. and Mrs. Kenneth Gleason Loudon, 405 E. Walnut St., Rawlins. LUERS, Ralph Donald, Seaman 1c, USN. Parents, mr. and Mrs.

Biography of Charles J. Price

Topeka had in Charles J. Price as a resident one of the most capable mining engineers of the country. His had been an experience very much out of the ordinary. Nearly forty years ago he was a mine worker in the Black Hill region. He had a practical working knowledge of the mincral sections of the northwest country. He spent a number of years as a mining engineer in South Africa, and probably no American citizen had a closer knowledge of the people, the industrial conditions, of South Africa than Mr. Price. While there he served with the rank of

Red Cloud

Far away in Wyoming lived the Sioux Indians, a fierce and warlike tribe. They called themselves Dakotas; but their enemies said that when they fought they did everything in a mean, hidden way so that it was hard to know what to expect, and they called them Sioux, which means “snake-like-ones.” To this tribe belonged a young brave who wanted very much to become a chief. His father was a fierce warrior and had taught him how to fight, but he was not satisfied to follow the leaders of his tribe, for he wanted to lead other Indians himself. When

Biography of Paul Helmer Young

Paul Helmer Young, representative of the bond department of the National Bank of Commerce at St. Louis and president of the St. Louis Junior Chamber of Commerce, is one of the most alert, wide-awake and progressive of the young business men of the city. He was born in Lander, Wyoming, July 26, 1896. He is therefore a western man by birth, training and experience and has always been possessed by the spirit of western enterprise and progress which has been the dominant element in the upbuilding of the great empire beyond the Mississippi. His father, the Rev. Benjamin Young, is

Pawnee Indians

Pawnee Indians. The name is derived by some from the native word pariki, “a horn,” a term said to be used to designate their peculiar manner of dressing the scalp lock; but Lesser and Weltfish (1932) consider it more likely that it is from parisu, “hunter,” as claimed by themselves. They were also called Padani and Panana by various tribes. Also known as: Ahihinin, Arapaho name, meaning “wolf people.” Awahi, Caddo and Wichita Dame. Awahu, Arikara name. Awó, Tonkawa name, originally used by the Wichita. Chahiksichahiks, meaning “men of men,” applied to themselves but also to all other tribes whom