Topic: Wea

Indian Treaties Waco to Yakima

Treaties for all tribes listed below. Names in (parentheses) are other names used for tribe Waco, Walla Walla, Wasco, Wea, Winnebago, Witchetaw, Wyandot and Yakima Tribes Waco Treaties (Wacoe) Treaty of May 15, 1846 Walla-Walla Treaties Treaty of June 25, 1855 Treaty of June 9, 1855 Treaty of November 15, 1865 Wasco Treaties Treaty of June 25, 1855 Treaty of November 15, 1865 Wea Treaties Treaty of August 3, 1795 Treaty of June 7, 1803 Treaty of August 21, 1805 Treaty of September 30, 1809 Treaty of October 26, 1809 Treaty of June 4, 1816 Treaty of October 2, 1818

Treaty of July 22, 1814

A treaty of peace and friendship between the United States of America, and the tribes of Indians called the Wyandots, Delawares, Shawanoese, Senecas, and Miamies. The said United States of America, by William Henry Harrison, late a major general in the army of the United States, and Lewis Cass, governor of the Michigan territory, duly authorized and appointed commissioners for the purpose, and the said tribes, by their head men, chiefs, and warriors, assembled at Greenville, in the state of Ohio, have agreed to the following articles, which, when ratified by the president of the United States, by and with

Treaty of August 11, 1820

A treaty made and concluded by Benjamin Parke, a Commissioner for that purpose on the part of the United States, of the one part; and the Chiefs, Warriors, and Head Men, of the Wea tribe of Indians, of the other part. Article I. The Chiefs, Warriors, and Head Men, of the said Tribe, agree to cede, and they do hereby cede and relinquish, to the United States all the lands reserved by the second article of the Treaty between the United States and the said Tribe, concluded at Saint Mary’s, on the second day of October, eighteen hundred and eighteen.

Treaty of June 4, 1816

Articles of a treaty made and entered into at Fort Harrison, in the Indiana Territory between Benjamin Parke, specially authorized thereto by the president of the United States, of the one part, and the tribes of Indians called the Weas and Kickapoos, by their chiefs and head men, of the other part. Article I. The Weas and Kickapoos again acknowledge themselves in peace and friendship with the United States. Article II.The said tribes acknowledge the validity of, and declare their determination to adhere to, the treaty of Greenville, made in the year seventeen hundred and ninety-five, and all subsequent treaties

Treaty of May 30, 1854

Articles of agreement and convention made and concluded at the city of Washington, this thirtieth day of May, one thousand eight hundred and fifty-four, by George W. Manypenny, commissioner on the part of the United States, and the following-named delegates representing the united tribes of Kaskaskia and Peoria, Piankeshaw and Wea Indians, viz: Kio-kaw-mo-zan, David Lykins; Sa-wa-ne-ke-ah, or Wilson; Sha-cah-quah, or Andrew Chick; Ta-ko-nah, or Mitchel; Che-swa-wa, or Rogers; and Yellow Beaver, they being duly authorized thereto by the said Indians. Article 1. The tribes of Kaskaskia and Peoria Indians, and of Piankeshaw and Wea Indians, parties to the two

Treaty of October 26, 1809

A convention entered into at Vincennes, in the Indiana territory, between William Henry Harrison, commissioner plenipotentiary of the United States, for treating with the Indian tribes north-west of the Ohio and the Wea tribe. The said tribe, by their Sachems and head warriors, hereby declare their full and free consent to the treaty concluded at fort Wayne, on the thirtieth ultimo, by the above mentioned commissioner, with the Delaware, Miami, Putawatimie, and Eel river tribes; and also to the separate article entered into on the same day with the Miami and Eel river tribes. And the said commissioner, on the

Treaty of October 29, 1832

Articles of a treaty made and concluded at Castor Hill in the county of St. Louis and State of Missouri, between William Clark, Frank J. Allen, and Nathan Kouns, Commissioners on the part of the United States, of the one part, and the undersigned Chiefs, Warriors and Counselors, of the Piankeshaw and Wea tribes of Indians, in behalf of their said tribes, of the other part. Article 1.The undersigned Chiefs, Warriors, and considerate men, for themselves and their said tribes, for and in consideration of the stipulations hereinafter made, do hereby cede and relinquish to the United States forever, all

Treaty of February 23, 1867

Articles of agreement, concluded at Washington, D. C., the twenty-third day of February, one thousand eight hundred and sixty-seven, between the United States, represented by Lewis V. Bogy, Commissioner of Indian Affairs, W. H. Watson, special commissioner, Thomas Murphy, superintendent of Indian Affairs, George C. Snow, and G. A. Colton, U. S. Indian agents, duly authorized, and the Senecas, represented by George Spicer and John Mush; the Mixed Senecas and Shawnees, by John Whitetree, John Young, and Lewis Davis; the Quapaws, by S. G. Vallier and Ka-zhe-cah; the Confederated Peorias, Kaskaskias, Weas, and Piankeshaws, by Baptiste Peoria, John Mitchell, and

Treaty of Greenville 1795

Treaty of August 3, 1795

Treaty of August 3, 1795, also known as the Treaty of Greenville. The Treaty of Greenville set a precedent for objectives in future treaties with Native Americans — that is, obtaining cessions of land, advancing the frontier through white settlement, and obtaining more cessions through treaties. With the tribes’ surrender of most of Ohio, settlers began entering in Northwest Territory in greater numbers. In the near future, more treaties would further diminish Indians’ territory. A treaty of peace between the United States of America and the Tribes of Indians, called the Wyandot, Delaware, Shawanoe, Ottawa, Chipewa, Putawatime, Miami, Eel River, Weea, Kickapoo, Piankashaw, and Kaskaskia.

Treaty of June 7, 1803

Articles of a treaty between the United States of America, and the Delaware, Shawanoe, Putawatimie, Miamie, Eel River, Weea, Kickapoo, Piankashaw, and Kaskaskia nations of Indians. Articles of a treaty made at Fort Wayne on the Miami of the Lake, between William Henry Harrison, governor of the Indiana territory, superintendent of Indian affairs and commissioner plenipotentiary of the United States for concluding any treaty or treaties which may be found necessary with any of the Indian tribes north west of the Ohio, of the one part, and the tribes of Indians called the Delawares, Shawanoe, Putawatimie, Miami and Kickapoo, by