Topic: Chinook

English to Chinook Dictionary

Above, ságh-a-lie. Absolve, mam’-ook stoh. Acorns, káh-na-way. Across, in’-a-ti. Afraid, kwass. After, Afterwards, kim’-ta. Again, weght. All, kon’-a-way. Alms, e’-la-han, or e-lann’. Also, weght. Although, kégh-tchie. Always, kwáh-ne-sum. American, Boston. Amusement, hee’-hee. And, pee. Anger, Angry, sol’-leks. Apple, le pome. Apron, kéh-su, or ki’-su. Arbutus uva ursi, lahb. Arrive at, ko. Arrow, ka-li’-tan. As if, káh-kwa spose. At, ko’-pa. Aunt, kwal’h. Awl, shoes keep’-wot. Axe, la-hash’. Bad, me-sáh-chie; pe-shuk’. Bag, le sak. Ball, le bal. Bargain, máh-kook; húy-húy. Bark, s’ick-skin. Barrel, ta-mo’-litsh. Basket, o’-pe-kwan. Beads, ka-mo’-suk. Bear (black), chet’-woot; its’woot; (grizzly), si-am’. Beat, to, kok’-shut. Beaver, ee’-na. Because, kéh-wa. Become,

Chinook to English Dictionary

Ah-ha, adv. Common to various tribes. Yes. Expression of simple assent. On Puget Sound, E-ÉH. Ah’n-kut-te, or Ahn-kot-tie, adv. Chinook, ANKUTTI. Formerly; before now. With the accent prolonged on the first syllable, a long time ago. Ex. Ahnkutte lakit sun, four days ago; Tenas ahnkutte, a little while since. Al-áh, interj. Expression of surprise. Ex. Alah mika chahko! ah, you’ve come! Al-kie, adv. Chinook, ALKEKH. Presently; in a little while; hold on; not so fast. Al’-ta , adv. Chinook, ALTAKH. Now; at the present time. A-mo’-te, n. Chinook, AMUTE; Clatsop, KLABOTÉ. The strawberry. An-áh , interj. An exclamation denoting pain,

Twenty-one Analogies between the Chinook and other Native Languages

Setting aside interjections, common in a more or less modified form to several adjoining tribes, twenty-one words of those given in this vocabulary present noticeable analogies between the Chinook and other native languages. They are as follows: English Chinook Hailtzuk and Belbella salmon berries klalilli olalli   English Chinook and Clatsop Nootka (Jewitt and Cook) water tl’tsuk: tl’chukw chauk: chahak   English Chinook Cowlitz Kwantlen Selish six tákhum tukh’um tuckhum’ táckan   English Chinook Chihalis Nisqually deep kellippe kluputl klep glad kwan kwal (“tame”) proud eyútl júil demon ichiatku tsiatko tsiatko black bear eitchhut, chetwut crow skaka skaka oyster klokhklokh

Words Constituting the Jargon

The number of words constituting the Jargon proper has been variously stated. Many formerly employed have become in great measure obsolete, while others have been locally introduced. Thus, at the Dalles of the Columbia, various terms are common which would not be intelligible at Astoria or on Puget Sound. In making the following selection, I have included all those which, on reference to a number of vocabularies, I have found current at any of these places, rejecting, on the other hand, such as individuals, partially acquainted with the native languages, have employed for their own convenience. The total number falls

Analogy between the Nootkan and Columbian or Chinook

Dr. Scouler’s analogy between the Nootkan and “Columbian,” or Chinook, was founded on the following words: English Tlaoquatch and Nutka Columbian plenty *aya *haya no *wik *wake water tchaak chuck good *hooleish *closh bad *peishakeis *peshak man *tchuckoop tillicham woman *tlootsemin *clootchamen child *tanassis *tanass now tlahowieh clahowiah come *tchooqua *sacko slave mischemas *mischemas what are you doing *akoots-ka-*mamook ekta-*mammok what are you saying *au-kaak-*wawa ekta-*wawa let me see *nannanitch *nannanitch sun *opeth ootlach sky *sieya  *saya fruit  *chamas *camas to sell *makok *makok understand *commatax *commatax * But of these, none marked with an asterisk belong to the Chinook

Chinook Indian Research

Chinook Indians (from Tsinúk, their Chehalis name). The best-known tribe of the Chinookan family. They claimed the territory on the north side of Columbia River, Wash., from the mouth to Grays bay, a distance of about 15 miles, and north along the seacoast as far as the north part of Shoalwater bay, where they were met by the Chehalis, a Salish tribe. The Chinook were first described by Lewis and Clark, who visited them in 1805, though they had been known to traders for at least 12 years previously. Read more about Chinook History Chinook Indian Biographies Native American Biographies

Klikitat Tribe

Klikitat Indians, Klickitat Tribe, Klickitat Indians (Chinookan: ‘beyond,’ with reference to the Cascade Mountains. ). A Shahaptian tribe whose former seat was at the headwaters of the Cowlitz, Lewis, White Salmon, and Klickitat rivers, north of Columbia River, in Klickitat and Skamania Counties, Washington. Their eastern neighbors were the Yakima, who speak a closely related language, and on the west they were met by various Salishan and Chinookan tribes. In 1805 Lewis and Clark reported them as wintering on Yakima and Klickitat rivers, and estimated their number at about 700. Between 1820 and 1830 the tribes of Willamette valley were visited by

Wasco Tribe

Wasco Indians. A Chinookan tribe formerly living on the south side of Columbia river, in the neighborhood of The Dalles, in Wasco County, Oregon. This tribe, with the Wishram (also known as Tlakluit and Echeloot), on the north side of the river, were the easternmost branches of the Chinookan family.

Kle-Mat-Chosny. Agate Arrow-Point

Watlala Tribe

Watlala Indians. Watlala Tribe. A division of the Chinookan family formerly living at the cascades of Columbia River and, at least in later times, on Dog (now Hood) river about halfway between the cascades and The Dalles, in Wasco County, Oregon. Early writers mention several tribes at or near the cascades, but as the population of that region was very changeable from the fact of its being a much frequented fishing resort, and as many of the so-called tribes were merely villages, often of small size, it is now impossible to identify them with certainty. After the epidemic of 1829,

Chinookan Indians

Chinookan Family, Chinookan People. An important linguistic family, including those tribes formerly living on Columbia River, from The Dalles to its mouth (except a small strip occupied by the Athapascan Tlatskanai), and on the lower Willamette as far as the present site of Oregon City, Oregon. The family also extended a short distance along the coast on each side of t he mouth of the Columbia, from Shoal Water Bay on the north to Tillamook Head on the south. The family is named from the Chinook, the most important tribe. With the exception of a few traders near the mouth