Surname: Willard

Edmund Anthony

Anthony Family of Bristol County Massachusetts

The Anthony family of Bristol County Massachusetts descend from one John Anthony of Hampstead England who travelled in the Hercules to New England and settled in Rhode Island in 1634. This family, under the entrepreneurship of Edmund Anthony, became prominent publishers of many early Massachusetts papers, some of which were prominent in the establishment of the Republican Party and it’s causes.

Gleanings from English Records about New England Families

Gleanings from English Records about New England Families

The classic work often cited by more contemporaneous authors on early New England families and the records of them found within the Principal Probate Registry, Somerset House, Strand, the Public Record Office, Fetter Lane, and the British Museum, Bloomsbury, while on a visit in London during the summer and fall of 1879.

Genealogical and Family History of the State of Vermont vol 1

Genealogical and Family History of Vermont

Hiram Charlton took on the publication of the Genealogical and Family History of the State of Vermont for Lewis Publishing. In it, he enlisted the assistance of living residents of the state in providing biographical and genealogical details about their family, and then he published all 1104 family histories in two distinct volumes.

Knapp’s Mill, Norwich, Vermont

History of the Industries of Norwich VT

Although the products of the industries in Norwich have not been of great magnitude they have been quite varied in character. Such information in regard to these callings as we have been able to obtain we will present to our readers, though not in strict chronological order. Among the earliest establishments coming under this head was a grist mill established as early as 1770, by Hatch and Babcock on Blood Brook, on or near the site of the grist mill now operated by J. E. Willard, a short distance up the stream from where it empties into the Connecticut River.

Norwich Vermont in the Revolutionary War

The sources of information in regard to the part taken by the town in the Revolutionary struggle are few and scanty. The earliest allusion in the town records to this important epoch of the country’s history is found in the election of a Committee of Safety at the annual town meeting, March 11, 1777. This committee was five in number: Deacon Joseph Smalley, Samuel Hutchinson, John Hatch, Captain Hezekiah Johnson and John Hopson. There is much reason to believe, however, that this was not the first Committee of Safety that acted for the town; but was a new committee selected

Fort Dummer

Narrative of the Captivity of Nehemiah How

A Narrative of the captivity of Nehemiah How, who was taken by the Indians at the Great Meadow Fort above Fort Dummer, where he was an inhabitant, October 11th, 1745. Giving an account of what he met with in his traveling to Canada, and while he was in prison there. Together with an account of Mr. How’s death at Canada. Exceedingly valuable for the many items of exact intelligence therein recorded, relative to so many of the present inhabitants of New England, through those friends who endured the hardships of captivity in the mountain deserts and the damps of loathsome prisons. Had the author lived to have returned, and published his narrative himself, he doubtless would have made it far more valuable, but he was cut off while a prisoner, by the prison fever, in the fifty-fifth year of his age, after a captivity of one year, seven months, and fifteen days. He died May 25th, 1747, in the hospital at Quebec, after a sickness of about ten days. He was a husband and father, and greatly beloved by all who knew him.

Simon Willard Genealogy

The Willard Memoir [Joseph Willard], Soldiers in King Philip’s War [George M. Bodge], History of Cambridge [Paige], History of Concord [Shattuck], History of Groton [Butler], New England Historical and Genealogical Register, all give interesting accounts of Major Simon Willard, one of the finest types of a Puritan, living in New England in the middle of the seventeenth century [1634-76]. Simon Willard Simon1 Willard was b. at Horsmonden, County Kent, England; bap. April 17, 1605. He was the son of Richard Willard by wife Margery, and brother of Margery [Willard] Davis, who married, in England, DOLAR DAVIS. The family name in

Biographical Sketch of Doctor George F. B. Willard

Willard, Doctor George F. B., Vergennes, was born in Boston, Mass., in 1853. He was a graduate of Middlebury College in 1876, and also a graduate of the St. Louis Medical College in 1883, after which he settled in Vergennes, Vt. He was married in December, 1883, to H. Ada Vedder, who was born at Whitehall, Illinois. They have had one daughter born to them — Delana E. George F. B. Willard was a son of George and Delana D. (Lake) Willard. She was born in Addison county, Vt., and he was born in Prescott, Canada, and died in 1860,

Biography of Julius Terrass Willard, Prof.

Not so many years ago many men regarded the application of science to agriculture as an idle theory and it is within the lifetime of such men as Prof. Julius Terrass Willard, dean of the division of general science, professor of chemistry, and chemist of the agricultural experiment station, in the Kansas State Agricultural College, at Manhattan, that these doubters have been convinced. Applied science had not only revolutionized many phases of agriculture but is bringing this most important of industries to the forefront in scholarly study and research. America had held her position for many years as a granary

Biography of Julius T. Willard

Julius T. Willard was reared on the home farm and there, in his youth learned valuable lessons through toil and perseverance which have influenced his whole career, and been potent factors in the success which had crowned his life of earnest effort. He attended the best school in the county, was studious and ambitious, and very early developed an interest in sciences. At the time there were fewer opportunities for schooling than at present, but he took advantage of all within his reach, and, in 1879, entered the Kansas State Agricultural College from which he was graduated in 1883 with