Surname: Trott

Weymouth ways and Weymouth people

Weymouth ways and Weymouth people

Edward Hunt’s “Weymouth ways and Weymouth people: Reminiscences” takes the reader back in Weymouth Massachusetts past to the 1830s through the 1880s as he provides glimpses into the people of the community. These reminiscences were mostly printed in the Weymouth Gazette and provide a fair example of early New England village life as it occurred in the mid 1800s. Of specific interest to the genealogist will be the Hunt material scattered throughout, but most specifically 286-295, and of course, those lucky enough to have had somebody “remembered” by Edward.

A History of Peaks Island and Its People

A History of Peaks Island Maine and its People

A history of Peaks Island and its people: also a short history of House Island, Portland, Maine. In presenting this history of two of the best known islands in Portland Harbor, it has been the intention of the author to give only the story of the early days of those islands, and of the families who have contributed to their history.

Biographical Sketch of W. L. Trott

(See Adair)-John Adair, a Scotchman, married Gahoka, a full blood Cherokee woman of the Deer Clan. Their son, Samuel, married Edith, a white woman, and they were the parents of Rachel Pounds Adair, who married Reverend James Jenkins Trott, who, as early as 1828, was the “general missionary” of the Methodist church among the Cherokees in Georgia, Tennessee, Alabama and North Carolina. Their son, William Lafayette Trott, born March 10, 1844, married Malinda Stover, born September 20, 1848, and died September 20, 1868, He then married Louisa J. Moore in 1869. She died July 9, 1918. They were the parents

Biographical Sketch of Mrs. James Campbell Trott

(See Ward and Adair)-James Campbell Trott, born Apr. 6, at Woodburt, Tenn., educated there. Married March 1, 1868 Madora Stover, born Jan. 25, 1852 on Beattie’s Prairie, Delaware District. They are the parents of Birdie Adair, born Nov. 25, 1869; Eugene Homer, born March 18, 1873 and Willie Trott, born September 29, 1881. James Trott’s Cherokee name is Osceola. He is retired from business and he and his wife are members of the Christian church.

1830 Map of Cherokee Territory in Georgia

Biographies of the Cherokee Indians

Whatever may be their origins in antiquity, the Cherokees are generally thought to be a Southeastern tribe, with roots in Georgia, North Carolina, and Tennessee, among other states, though many Cherokees are identified today with Oklahoma, to which they had been forcibly removed by treaty in the 1830s, or with the lands of the Eastern Band of Cherokees in western North Carolina. The largest of the so-called Five Civilized Tribes, which also included Choctaws, Chickasaws, Creeks, and Seminoles, the Cherokees were the first tribe to have a written language, and by 1820 they had even adopted a form of government