Surname: Strange

Ancestors of George Albert Chace of Fall River, MA

CHACE (Fall River family). In and about Fall River for generations the Chace (earlier generations using the orthography Chase) family has been conspicuous in the affairs of that section and especially for a century past in its industrial life. In the particular line of Joseph Chase, who settled in Swansea, the family becoming a Swansea-Somerset one, such names as Oliver, Harvey, James H., Hon. Jonathan and George Albert Chace – the latter of whom planned and built a number of the large cotton mills of Fall River, was long treasurer and manager of the Bourne Mill, in Tiverton, R. I., and as well was a most active and useful citizen of Fall River – will long endure in the annals of this great industrial section. There follows from the first American ancestor of the Chaces named to the present in chronological order the genealogy and family history of the children of the late George Albert Chace of Fall River.

Biographical Sketch of Cicero, J. Strange

(See Grant, Ghigau, Oolootsa and Adair)-Cicero James, son of William and Samantha (Boss) Strange was born February 8, 1874 in Georgia and educated in that state. Married at Chelsea December 24, 1894, Mary Bright, daughter of John Polk and Emily Jane (Walker) Drake, born January 28, 1878. They are the parents of: Mary Emma, born September 30, 1895; John Drake born February 13, 1895; Janie Anna, born April 5, 1900; Ella, born Feb. 11, 1902; Lulu Euphemia born June 26, 1904; Frank J. born February 27, 1906; Charles, born Jan. 4, 1909; Florence, born Sent. 17, 1916 and Margaret Strange

Biography of Orlando S. Strange, M.D.

Orlando Sampson Strange, one of the leading physicians and surgeons of Kingston, and a native of this city, was born June 13, 1826, his father being John Strange, of Glasgow, Scotland, and for several years a merchant at Kingston. His mother was Mary McGill, who was born in Albany, N. Y., and was of Scotch descent. The subject of this sketch supplemented a grammar school course of education with two years at Queen’s College; studied medicine with Dr. James Sampson, of Kingston; attended lectures at the University of New York, in 1847-1849, and there received the degree of M.D., in

Robert Strange

Capt., F. A., Btry. A, 6th Div., 78th Regt.; of New Hanover County; son of Robert and Mrs. Elizabeth Stone Strange. Husband of Mrs. Mary Taylor Strange. Entered service May 25, 1917, at Wilmington, N.C. Sent to 2nd O. R. T. C., Ft. Oglethorpe, Ga., transferred to Camp Logan, Texas, to Camp Douglas, Okla. Sailed for France July 27, 1917. Promoted to rank of Capt. Nov. 27, 1917. Fought south of Verdun with French Army. Mustered out at Camp Dix May 12, 1919.

Frank Strange

1st Sergt., Inf., Co. M, 81st Div., 324th Regt.; of Onslow County; son of James D. and Mrs. Rebecca Strange. Entered service Oct. 19, 1917, at Jacksonville, N.C. Sent to Camp Jackson, transferred to Camp Sevier, then to Camp Mills. Sailed for France Aug. 5, 1918. Promoted to rank of Corpl. Jan. 15, 1918; to Sergt. Aug. 15, 1918. Fought at Vosges Mtns., Meuse-Argonne. 1st Sergt. Dec. 3, 1918. Returned to USA June 18, 1919. Mustered out at Camp Jackson, S. C., June 26, 1919.

1830 Map of Cherokee Territory in Georgia

Biographies of the Cherokee Indians

Whatever may be their origins in antiquity, the Cherokees are generally thought to be a Southeastern tribe, with roots in Georgia, North Carolina, and Tennessee, among other states, though many Cherokees are identified today with Oklahoma, to which they had been forcibly removed by treaty in the 1830s, or with the lands of the Eastern Band of Cherokees in western North Carolina. The largest of the so-called Five Civilized Tribes, which also included Choctaws, Chickasaws, Creeks, and Seminoles, the Cherokees were the first tribe to have a written language, and by 1820 they had even adopted a form of government