Surname: Nicks

Clermont, Osage Chief

Western Garrison Life

Grant Foreman describes the early life in a Western Garrison; providing insights on some of the traders in the region, the deaths of Seaton, Armstrong, Wheelock and Izard, all soldiers obviously familiar to him. But he also shares the story of the elopement of Miss Sarah Knox Taylor, daughter of General Taylor, to Lieutenant Jefferson Davis… yes, THAT Jefferson Davis.

An interesting section of the chapter are the references to the punishments inflicted upon the soldiers in the event of their disobedience.

Painted by Catlin in 1834, the picture attached is of Clermont, chief of the Osage Tribe. Clermont is painted in full length, wearing a fanciful dress, his leggings fringed with scalp-locks, and in his hand his favorite and valued war-club.

Irving Washington

Washington Irving at Fort Gibson, 1832

The McIntosh Creeks had been located along Arkansas River near the Verdigris on fertile timbered land which they began at once to clear, cultivate, and transform into productive farms. The treaty of 1828 with the Cherokee gave the latter a great tract of land on both sides of Arkansas River embracing that on which the Creeks were located. This was accomplished by a blunder of the Government officials, in the language of the Secretary of War, 1U.S. House, Executive Documents, 22d congress, first session, no. 116, President’s Message submitting the memorial of the Creek Indians. “when we had not a

Jesse Graham Nicks

Private, Co. H, 30th Div., 119th Inf. Reg.; of Alamance County; son of A. H. and Donna E. Nicks. Entered service April 1, 1918, at Swepsonville, N.C. Sent to Camp Jackson. Transferred to Camp Sevier, then to Camp Merritt. Sailed for France May 11, 1918. Was in all battles with 119th until wounded near St. Souplet, Oct. 10, 1918, by shell. Sent to Australian Hospital, then Convalescent Camp, France. Returned to USA April 2, 1919. Mustered out at Camp Jackson, April 9, 1919.