Surname: Langston

Chief William Terrill Bradby, Pamunkey

Powhatan Featherwork

We now come to what is perhaps the most interesting topic in the material life of the southern tribes, the woven feather technique. An art so ancient and so elaborate can hardly be expected to have persisted from colonial times down to the present day where the process of deculturation among the conquered tribes has gone so far. But surprising as it is, the Virginia Indians have not entirely forgotten, nor even lost, the art of weaving feathers into the foundation of textile fabrics. The antiquity of the woven-feather technique is attested by virtually all the authors of the old

Chickahominy children cracking walnuts with stone mortar and pounder

Powhatan Agriculture

A review of some agricultural practices of the Powhatan shows but a few traces of aboriginal Indian survival by the 1920’s.

Pamunkey fishermen returning from their nets.

Powhatan Fishing Customs

The Powhatan tribes still adhere to some fishing practices worth mentioning. Until not long ago fish fences were employed. These were chiefly for sturgeon, but now this splendid fish is so scarce that whereas thirty years ago from three to six a day during July and August would be taken, now the record is three a season by six boats fishing the same period. Captain John Smith mentions 52 and 68 being taken ”at a draught.” 1Smith’s account of Virginia in Tyler, L. G., Narratives of Early Virginia, New York, 1907, p. 85. The Virginia explorers noted the great abundance

Big bend in Pamunkey River; Uttamussak in the distance.

Pamunkey Hunting Grounds

Perhaps the most striking feature of all in the natural history of the modern Pamunkey comes before us in the survival of the controlled hunting and trapping rights: the custom by which each hunter in the band controls an assigned and definitely bounded area within which he enjoys the exclusive privilege of setting his traps for fur-bearing animals.

Lee Major, Mattaponi, wearing native hat made of duck skins

Mattaponi Tribe History

For good reasons the Mattaponi Indians may be classified definitely as a branch of the Pamunkey, as such, their history often mirrors theirs.

John D. Langston

Lt. Col., J. A. G. Dept.; of Wayne County; son of George D. and Mrs. Sallie Langston. Husband of Mrs. Mary W. Langston. Entered service Dec. 4, 1917, at Goldsboro, N.C. Sent to Raleigh, N.C. Appointed member of Dist. Board for Eastern District of N.C. July 27, 1917. Elected chairman of board. Was commissioned as major, Officers Reserve Corps, Dec. 4, 1917, and ordered to report to the Governor of N.C. as special aide in the administration of the draft. Took active charge of the State Draft and served in that capacity until Sept. 5, 1918. Was transferred to the

Rough Riders

Rough Riders

Compiled military service records for 1,235 Rough Riders, including Teddy Roosevelt have been digitized. The records include individual jackets which give the name, organization, and rank of each soldier. They contain cards on which information from original records relating to the military service of the individual has been copied. Included in the main jacket are carded medical records, other documents which give personal information, and the description of the record from which the information was obtained.