Surname: Heard

Elmer C. Packard

Ancestry of Elmer C. Packard of Brockton Massachusetts

For nearly two hundred and seventy-five years the Packard family has been one prominent and influential in New England, and it has become a most numerous family, too, many of whose members both at home and abroad have given a good account of themselves. Samuel Packard, the immigrant ancestor of this family, became one of the early settlers of the ancient town of Bridgewater, and all of the name who have gone from the Bridgewaters were probably descendants of his; in fact, nearly all of the name in this country can be traced to that place. The genealogical records following

3rd Page of Bartlett Family Genealogy

Bartlett Family Genealogy

Typing on six onion skinned papers, Ralph Sylvester Bartlett presented his lineage in the early 1900’s. His Bartlett family were early pioneers in Kittery Maine in the section later known as Eliot Maine. Whether he ever meant to compile these pages into book form is left for you to interpret, but somebody did eventually compile the 6 pages they had of his family tree. We provide the entire 6 pages in digital format below the transcription.

The Abduction of Daniel Boone's Daughter by the Indians

Indian Captivity Narratives

This collection contains entire narratives of Indian captivity; that is to say, we have provided the reader the originals without the slightest abridgement. Some of these captivities provide little in way of customs and manners, except to display examples of the clandestine warfare Native Americans used to accomplish their means. In almost every case, there was a tug of war going on between principle government powers, French, American, British, and Spanish, and these powers used the natural prowess of the Indians to assist them in causing warfare upon American and Canadian settlers. There were definitely thousands of captivities, likely tens of thousands, as the active period of these Indian captivity narratives covers 150 years. Unfortunately, few have ever been put under a pen by the original captive, and as such, we have little first-hand details on their captivity. These you will find here, are only those with which were written by the captive or narrated to another who could write for them; you shall find in a later collection, a database of known captives, by name, location, and dates, and a narrative about their captivity along with factual sources. But that is for another time.

Slave Narrative of Mrs. Celestia Avery

Interviewer: Ross Person Interviewed: Celestia Avery Location: Georgia Place of Birth: Troupe County, LaGrange GA Age: 75 “A Few Facts Of Slavery” As Told By Celestia Avery—ex-Slave [MAY 8 1937] Mrs. Celestia Avery is a small mulatto woman about 5 ft. in height. She has a remarkably clear memory in view of the fact that she is about 75 years of age. Before the interview began she reminded the writer that the facts to be related were either told to her by her grandmother, Sylvia Heard, or were facts which she remembered herself. Mrs. Avery was born 75 years ago

Slave Narrative of Mrs. Emmaline Heard

Person Interviewed: Emmaline Heard Location: 239 Cain Street On December 3 and 4, 1936, Mrs. Emmaline Heard was interviewed at her home, 239 Cain Street. The writer had visited Mrs. Heard previously, and it was at her own request that another visit was made. This visit was supposed to be one to obtain information and stories on the practice of conjure. On two previous occasions Mrs. Heard’s stories had proved very interesting, and I knew as I sat there waiting for her to begin that she had something very good to tell me. She began: “Chile, this story wuz told

Biography of William E. Heard

William E. Heard, clerk of the district court of the fourth judicial district of Idaho, and ex-officio auditor and recorder in and for Blaine County, Idaho, is a native of Missouri. He was born May 21, 1865, in a part of Benton county which has since been set off to form Hickory county, where John Heard, his grandfather, settled in 1832 and died in 1864. John Heard was a typical southern gentleman, born in the south in 1796. He lived in the south until about 1830, when he moved to Benton county, Missouri, becoming one of its first settlers. Earl

Heard, William (Hearing) Mrs. – Obituary

Mrs. William Heard[Hearing] Dies in Baker on Saturday Funeral services were held Tuesday in Haines Methodist church for Mrs. William Hearing, 63, who died at her home in Baker Saturday night. The deecased[deceased] was born September 7, 1879, in McLeansboro, Illinois. She came with her parents, the late Mr. and Mrs. Edwin H. Pratt, to Union in 1891. Four years later they moved to a farm near Haines. She was married to William Hearing June 23[24], 1903. They moved to Baker in 1939. Surviving, besides her husband, are a daughter, Mrs. Fred Pembrook of North Powder; three brothers, George W.