Surname: Dixon

Slave Narrative of Mary Colbert

Interviewer: Sadie B. Hornsby Person Interviewed: Mary Colbert Location: Athens, Georgia (NOTE: This is the first story we have had in which the client did not use any dialect. Mary Colbert’s grammar was excellent. Her skin was almost white, and her hair was quite straight. None of us know what a “deep” slave was. It may have the same meaning as outlandish Negro. The “outlandish Negroes” were those newly arrived Negroes who had just come in from any country outside of the United States of America, and were untrained. They were usually just from Africa. Sarah H. Hall) With the

Biography of Ralph Chester Dixon

Ralph Chester Dixon. While many of the successful men represented in this publication have found their work as farmers, eattle men, merchants, bankers and in the professions, Ralph Chester Dixon had directed his energies practically along one line since leaving college and had made a notable success as a fruit grower and horticulturist in the vicinity of Arkansas City. He had a splendid fruit farm three miles northwest of the city, and is one of the leading commercial apple growers of the state. Mr. Dixon is a native of Kansas, born at Caldwell August 5, 1875. His people have lived

Biography of Henry Edward Dixon

Henry Edward Dixon, a member of one of the old and well known families of Oklahoma, is a leading representative of the Delaware County bar, being engaged in practice at Grove, and he has gained an enviable reputation in a profession which calls for ability of a high order and requires close application, good judgment and a constantly widening comprehension of the relations and responsibilities which go to make up civilized society. He was born in Watseka, Iroquois County, Illinois, on the 13th of January, 1872, a son of Marion and Georgiana (Seward) Dixon, the former a native of Indiana

Ben Franklin Dixon

Capt., Inf., Co. K, 30th Div., 120th Regt.; of Cleveland County. Born May 29, 1879; son of Ben Franklin Dixon and Mrs. Leonora Tracy Dixon. Entered service July 25, 1917, at Asheboro, N.C. Sent to Camp Sevier, Greenville, S. C. Transferred to Camp Dix, N. J. Sailed for France May 17, 1918. Fought at Canal Sector, Ypres, Belgium, Hindenburg Line Offensive. Wounded at Hindenburg Line Sept. 29, 1918; 1st in leg, 2nd in throat, 3rd in upper arm and back before being mortally wounded. Advanced 150 yards after third wound, then mortally wounded by shell fire. Killed at Hindenburg Line

W. L. Dixon

Aviator, Inf., Co. C, 115th Div.; of Nash County; son of W. F. and Mrs. Flora Dixon. Husband of Lottie Dixon. Entered service Aug. 5, 1918, at Rocky Mount, N.C. Sent to Camp Wadsworth, S. C. Mustered out at Camp Wadsworth, S. C.

Wyatt T. Dixon

Sergt., 113th F. Artly., Btry. C, 30th Div. Born in Durham County; the son of Mr. and Mrs. W. H. Dixon. Entered the service June 18, 1917, at Durham, N.C. Was sent to Camp Sevier, S. C., and from there to Camp Mills, N. J. Overseas to France, June 13, 1918. Fought at St. Mihiel, Argonne Forest, Woevre Sector. Mustered out at Camp Jackson, S. C., March 28, 1919.

Alex Dixon

1st Class Private, Inf., Co. I, 30th Div., 120th Regt.; of Orange County; son of W. M. and Mrs. Maggie Dixon. Husband of Mrs. Lee Dixon. Entered service April 25, 1917, at Hillsboro, N.C. Sent to Camp Sevier, S. C. Transferred to Camp Merritt. Sailed for France May 17, 1918. Fought at Hindenburg Line, Ypres. Wounded at Hindenburg Line Sept. 29th, by shell Sent to American Base Hospital No. 37. Returned to USA April 13, 1919. Mustered out at Camp Jackson, April 18, 1919.

Berton B. Dixon

Private, Ammunition Supply, 1st Army Corps; of Wilson County; son of Wm. R. and Mrs. Bessie Dixon. Entered service Nov. 2, 1917, at Wilson. Sent to Camp Jackson, S. C. Transferred to Camp Merritt. Sailed for France June 16, 1918. Fought at Chateau-Thierry, St. Mihiel, Argonne. Mustered out at Camp Lee, Va., April 15, 1919.

Dewey P. Dixon

Private, 1st Class, Air Service, Btry. B, Casual Detachment; of Craven County; son of J. B. and Mrs. Mary F. Dixon. Entered service June 22, 1916, at New Bern, N.C. Sent to Camp Glenn. Transferred to Camp Mills, N. J. Sailed to British Islands April 27, 1917. Entitled to wear war chevron, one gold foreign chevron and Mexican service badge. Served on Mexican border Oct. 1, 1916, to March 22, 1917. Transferred as Mechanic in the Aviation Corps. Returned to USA Dec. 11, 1918. Mustered out at Camp Jackson, S. C., Dec. 23, 1918.

David L. Dixon

Sergt., Q. M. C.; of Lenoir County; son of D. V. and Corinne Palnch Dixon; husband of Martha Dixon. Entered service Aug. 27, 1917, at Kinston, N.C. Sent to Camp Sheridan, Ala. Transferred to Camp Johnson, Fla. Transferred to Camp Fremont, Cal. Going from there to Meiggs, D. C. Promoted to 2 M. C. Sergt. Jan., 1918. Discharged from Officers’ Training School, Camp Meiggs, Washington City, D. C. Mustered out at Camp Meiggs, D. C., Nov. 30, 1918.