True Relations – Warrior of the Powhatan

This so contented him, he as immediacy with attentive influence with a loud ovation he proclaimed me a Warrior of the Powhatan, and that all his subjects should esteem us and no man account us as strangers nor Paspaheghans, but Powhatans, and that the corn, women and the country should be to us as it is to their own people. This offered kindness for many reasons we commend not, but with the best Languages and signs of thanks that I could express. I took my leave. The King rising from his seat, conducted me forth and then caused each of my men to have as much bread as he could bear. Giving me some bread in a blanket, and as much he sent aboard our ship for a present to my father. Vitals you must know is all their wealth, and the greatest kindness they could show us. Arriving at the river, the barge was fallen to low, do to the ebb. Though I had given orders to sail to protect the fort. Yet the messenger had deceived me and the skies being very thick and rainy, the King understanding this mischance, sent his Son and Mamontacke, to conduct us to a great house sufficient to house me. When entering I saw it hung with bows and arrows. The Indians did all the vigilance too make us fires and give us content. The Kings doctors pleasantly entertained us with a kind ovation, with express charge that any should steal, or take out the bows or arrows, or offer any injury. As a Present he sent me a quarter of a venison to stay my stomach. In the evening he sent for me only and to come with only two musket shot with me. The company I had given orders to stand guard and to maintain two sentries at their post all night. For my supper he set before me meat for twenty men and seeing I could not eat, it was given to my men. For this is a general custom that they have, and you do not take again. And you must eat it , or carry it away. Two or three houses we stayed at during our stay, which when done I used a fire stick to return to my lodging. The next day the King conducting me to the river and showed me his canoes, and described to me how he sent them over the Bay for tribute he took beads. And also what countries paid him beads, copper and skins. But seeing Captain Newport and Pastier Scriuener coming a shore, the King returned to his house, and I went to meet them. With a trumpet before us, we march to meet the King. And who after this old manner kindly greeted the Captain, especially a boy of thirteen years old called Thomas Salvage, whom he gave as his Son. He requited this kindness giving each of us a great basket of beans and entertaining him with the former discourse. We passed away that day and agreed to bargain the next day and then returned to our Pinnis. The next day coming to shore in like order the king having kindly entertained us with a breakfast, questioned with us in this manner. Why we came armed in that fort, seeing he was our friend, and he had neither bows or arrows, what did we doubt. I told him it was the custom of our Country and not doubting his kindness, and with that he seemed satisfied. Yet Captain Newport caused all our men to retire to the water side, which was some thirty score from this. But to prevent the worst Paister Scrivener or I were either the one or the other by the barge. Experience had well taught me to believe his friendship until convenient opportunity surfaced him to betray us. But quickly this position had perceived my absence and cunning he sent for me and I sent for Paister Scriuener to supply my place, the King would demand for him. I would again Reline him, and they fought to satisfy or suspicion with kind language and not being agreed to trade for corn, he desired to see all our hatchets and copper together, for which he would give us corn, with that ancient trick the Chickahamania had acquainted me on. So his offer I refused and then offering to see what he would give for one piece. He seeming to dispose the nature of a merchant and did scorn to sell, but we freely should give him, and he liberally would request us.

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