Shakori Tribe

Shakori Indians. A small tribe associated with the Eno and Adshusheer in North Carolina in the 17th century. It is doubtful, from their physical characteristics, whether they were of Siouan stock, though they were allied with Siouan tribes. As the Shakori were constantly associated with the Eno they were probably linguistically related to them. They are first mentioned by Yardley (1654), who says a Tuscarora Indian described to him among other tribes of the interior “a great nation called Cacores,” of dwarfish stature, not exceeding. that of boys of 14 years, yet exceedingly brave and fierce in fight and active in retreat, so that even the powerful Tuscarora were unable to conquer them.

They were then near neighbors of the Eno. Lederer (1672) found the villages of the two tribes about 14 miles apart, that of the Shakori being farthest west. In 1701 Lawson found the two tribes confederated, and the Adshusheer with them. Their village, which he calls Adshusheer, was on Eno river about 14 miles east of the Occaneechi village, probably a short distance north east of the present Durham, North Carolina.

They resembled the Eno in their customs. According to Col. Barnwell, commander in the Tuscarora War of 1711, they are identical with the Sissipahaw.

For Further Study

The following articles and manuscripts will shed additional light on the Abenaki as both an ethnological study, and as a people. Consult:

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