Location: St. Clair County IL

Kiowa Calender

The Osage Massacre

When the treaty council with the Osage at Fort Gibson broke up in disagreement on April 2, 1833, three hundred Osage warriors under the leadership of Clermont departed for the west to attack the Kiowa. It was Clermont’s boast that he never made war on the whites and never made peace with his Indian enemies. At the Salt Plains where the Indians obtained their salt, within what is now Woodward County, Oklahoma, they fell upon the trail of a large party of Kiowa warriors going northeast toward the Osage towns above Clermont’s. The Osage immediately adapted their course to that pursued by their enemies following it back to what they knew would be the defenseless village of women, children, and old men left behind by the warriors. The objects of their cruel vengeance were camped at the mouth of Rainy-Mountain Creek, a southern tributary of the Washita, within the present limits of the reservation at Fort Sill.

Biography of Hon. Ninian Edwards

The eminent character of this gentleman requires more than a passing mention, in fact, a sketch of the early courts and bar of Christian County would be imperfect without an extended notice of him and his many public services. He has left a record in two States that time cannot efface. As a lawyer, jurist and statesman he was pre-eminently great. For nearly forty years he devoted his best energies to the service of his country, wielding an influence exceeded by few of his day and time. At the period when Judge Ninian Edwards lived his most active life, the surroundings

The Didier Family of Prairie du Rocher Illinois

Our country, which has been called the melting-pot of nations, has received citizens from every quarter of the known world. All races and peoples have sent their representatives to swell the numbers of our population. And of all these nations none has done more for America than France. Who can ever forget that it was the courageous Frenchmen who first penetrated the wilds of the new world, and, not content with a mere sailing along the coast, ascended its rivers and explored the interior of an unknown and dreaded wilderness? They settled vast areas such as the Mississippi Valley, which

The Siegfried Family of Prairie du Rocher Illinois

Anton Siegfried, whose address is Red Bud, Illinois, Rural Route #3, was born in Elsass, Germany, July 26, 1852. After leaving school he worked for his father on a farm until 1872, when he immigrated to America, direct to Red Bud. For a while he worked on a farm, and in 1876 rented a farm. In 1888 he became a dealer in cattle and hogs. In 1891 he went to Ruma and opened a meat market. Seven years later he also opened a general merchandise store. Mr. Siegfried did not confine his buying to live stock, but also bought and

Illinois Bellville Church Records

Illinois, Diocese of Belleville, Catholic Parish Records, 1695-1956

A help guide for accessing the images of parish registers recording the events of baptism, first communion, confirmation (to 1907), marriage (to 1930) or death (to 1956) in the Diocese of Belleville (Illinois), Roman Catholic Church. The index to some volumes may reference pages within a given volume beyond current publication dates. As such, these images are not currently available. In addition to traditional parish registers, this collection includes a small number of census, church history, family and financial records. To assist the researcher I have broken down the available registers by county and name of parish, including the years covered by those parish records.

Early Exploration and Native Americans

De Soto and his band gave to the Choctaws at Moma Binah and the Chickasaws at Chikasahha their first lesson in the white man’s modus operandi to civilize and Christianize North American Indians; so has the same lesson been continued to be given to that unfortunate people by his white successors from that day to this, all over this continent, but which to them, was as the tones of an alarm-bell at midnight. And one hundred and twenty-three years have passed since our forefathers declared all men of every nationality to be free and equal on the soil of the North

Escape From The Robber Band

Monday, Nov. 8, 1819.–The disappointment experienced from the unmanly conduct of Dr. Hill had a happy effect on our little company. It bound us more firmly and nearer together, and, I may add with truth, almost fitted us for the field of battle. The hour of 9 o’clock had now arrived, the night uncommonly dark and cloudy. On our going into the house one of the strangers went into the yard and gave the Indian warwhoop three times very loud. About 10 o’clock they took their six rifles, went into the yard with a candle and shot them off one

Biography of Francis Xavier Paquet

FRANCIS X. PAQUET. – Francis Xavier Paquet, son of Joseph Paquet and Marie Madaline Godant, was born in the parish of Saint John, about thirty miles west of Quebec, at the junction of the Jacquarka river with the St. Lawrence. Joseph Paquet was a stonemason by trade, but lived on a farm and took jobs of stonework. He was the father of eighteen children, nine boys and nine girls. F.X. Paquet, the sixteenth child in order, was born on the fifteenth day of January, 1811. He learned the trade of shipbuilding at Quebec, being apprenticed to Peter Labbe when not

Biographical Sketch of George H. Moser

George H. Moser, a well known and successful homeopathic physician of Arcola, was born in Auburn, Schuylkill County, Pennsylvania, December 19, 1859, and is the son of John Moser, a native of the same state. His mother was Alvinia Hellig, who was a descendant of Quaker ancestry. The Moser family are descendants of the Dutch, whose lineage is traced back by some of the members to Daniel Moser, who made his settlement in Pennsylvania in the year 1799. Doctor Moser came west and early in life turned his attention to the study of medicine. After a thorough preparation he entered

Biography of Alexander T. Primm, Jr.

Alexander T. Primm, Jr., widely known as a substantial citizen of St. Louis, thoroughgoing, reliable and energetic, is now a vice president of the J. Kennard & Sons Carpet Company, having entered the employ of the company on October 2, 1882. He was born in Belleville, St. Clair county, Illinois, April 12, 1864, and is a representative of one of the pioneer families of that locality. His ancestral history is an interesting one. The Primm family are descended from Alexander De La Pryme, a gentleman of the town of Ypres, France, who was granted a patent of gentility by the