Location: Potsdam New York

Hough Family of New Bedford, Massachusetts

The progenitor in New England of those bearing the family name of Hough was William Hough, son of Edward Hough, of Westchester, in Cheshire, England. This William Hough was known as a house carpenter at Gloucester, Mass., along just prior to the middle of the seventeenth century. He lived at Trynall Cove, where and on Biskie island, opposite, he had land. It is not known that his father came to New England, but it is believed by those who have written of the family that Ann Hough, who died at Gloucester in 1672, aged eighty-five years, was Edward’s widow and the mother of William Hough. The latter was selectman in 1649 and 1650. His departure from Gloucester is spoken of in the latter year, when he joined the migration to New London, Conn., and in that State the family is a numerous one. William Hough married Oct. 28, 1645, Sarah, daughter of Hugh Calkins, and of their ten children the first three were born at Gloucester and the others at New London.

Biographical Sketch of Horace E. H. Ruggles

The task of educating children of one of the peninsula’s most flourishing cities is the responsibility that falls on Horace E. H. Ruggles, supervising principal of the Burlingame schools. It was not long ago that Burlingame although destined to become one of the county’s leading cities, did not have a single school house within its boundaries. It was shortly after that Mr. Ruggles accepted his present position. With 217 children the Burlingame system was founded. In only three years the number of pupils increased to nearly 500. Burlingame has two handsome, modern, up-to-date school houses of which any community would

Biography of Rev. Isaac G. Hubbard

Rev. Isaac G. Hubbard, at one time the rector of Trinity Church, Claremont, was born here, April 13, 1818, son of Isaac and Ruth (Cobb) Hubbard. His grandfather, George Hubbard, who was a Lieutenant in the Revolutionary War, came to Claremont in 1778 from Tolland, Conn. Judge J. H. Hubbard, of Windsor, a son of George, was one of the ablest lawyers in New England. He was a powerful man, and as a pleader at the bar he had few equals. Isaac Hubbard, another son, who settled in Claremont, became a successful farmer and stock-raiser. He was an influential man,

Biography of Captain Harry C. Fay

Captain Harry C. Fay, editor-in-chief of the National Eagle, a bright and thoroughly up-to-date newspaper published in Claremont, was born in Richmond, Vt., November 30, 1830, son of Captain Nathan and Polly (Colby) Fay. Stephen Fay, his great-great-grandfather, was an early settler in Bennington, Vt., and was the father of eight children. His son John kept the Catamount Tavern, which during his day became a meeting-place for many great statesmen, who formed a legislative body, and held there meetings known as “Councils of Safety.” He, John, fell in the battle of Bennington. His son, Nathan Fay, served as a Colonel

Thomas Coburn

4. THOMAS2 COBURN (Asa1) was b. Sept. 9. 1790; m. Feb. 11, 1817, Almira Stone of Cornish, dau. of Dea. Josiah and Hannah (Weld) Stone, b. Sept. 2. 1792, and d. Jan. 6. 1869. They lived in Potsdam, N. Y. Children: i. HORATIO NEWTON. b. Oct. 19, 1817: d. May 24, 1820. ii. HIRAM BREWSTER, b. April 3, 1819. iii. MARTHA ALMIRA, b. Nov. 7, 1820. iv. SARAH JOANNA, b. July 22, 1822.

Biography of Chester P. Coburn

Among the well known and highly respected citizens of northern Idaho who have borne an important part in the development of the state is Chester P. Coburn, of Lewiston, whose name is enrolled among the pioneers who came to this section of the country in 1862. He aided in the organization not only of the state but of the territory, and has ever been a prominent factor in the progress and advancement which have wrought a marvelous transformation here. It is a well attested maxim that the greatness of a state lies not in its machinery of government, nor even

Biographical Sketch of Arthur Nathan Doud

Doud, Arthur Nathan; civil engineer; born, New York, 1872; son of George C. and Martha Dunbar Doud; graduated High School, Winthrop, N. Y., class of 1895; took three years special engineering course at Clarkson Technical School, Potsdam, N. Y., finished there in 1900; married, Buffalo, N. Y., Sept. 14, 1901, Nellie M. Wilson; two daughters; followed surveying and engineering work in New York state for three years; then engaged on the hydro-electric development on the St. Lawrence River; for two years and nine months member of the engineering corps, War Dept., U. S. Army, as chief of field party on

Biography of Albion Brainard Allen

For more than three decades a resident of Amherst, Hampshire County, and one of this town’s most active and substantial business men, Mr. Allen’s operations as a builder have contributed very materially not only to the development of his own community, but to that of numerous other New England towns. On his father’s side he is a member of an old family whose name is very frequently met throughout the United States, where it is represented by many distinct and separate families. Its use arises from the Christian name Allen or Alan, which is very ancient and has many variations