Location: Pettis County MO

Conner's General Merchandise Store, Prairie du Rocher

The Conner Family of Prairie du Rocher Illinois

There are few citizens of American blood, native born in Randolph County, who date their birth back as far as does Mr. W. S. Conner, a resident of the southern part of Township five — eight. He was born within a quarter of a mile of his present residence, in the year of 1815. He was the son of Henry Conner, who was born in Maryland and moved to Kentucky when ten years old, about the year 1795. The Conner family is of Irish extraction. The name was formerly spelled “O’Connor,” in which form it will be easily recognized as

Biographical Sketch of Mrs. William A. Lamon

(See Grant and Cordery)—Martha Evaline Clingan, born at Gibson Station Cherokee Nation, March 21, 1874, educated at the Female Seminary and Sedalia, Missouri, taught at Harrell Institute at Muskogee, and married at Gibson Station February 1, 1899 William Archibald, son of Robert A. and Melvina Lamon, born March 15, 1869 in Granada, Miss. They are the parents of: Mary F., born October 29, 1899; Melvina, born April 17, 1901; Catherine Wise, born October 27, 1902; Helen Martha, April 22, 1904; William Archibald, born February 4, 1910; Robert Edward, born February 4, 1912, and John Clingan Lamon, born May 3, 1913.

Biography of John H. Rice

John H. Rice had the distinction of having made his mark in two states of the Union of widely different tendencies–Georgia and Kansas. He was born in Greene County, Tennessee, November 14, 1825, and his father, a native of Virginia, was surveyor of the county, named for twenty-six consecutive terms. Mr. Rice commenced his higher education at Tusculum College, in his native county, of which his maternal uncle, Dr. Samuel W. Doak, was president. He was admitted to the bar in 1845 and, a few months afterward, opened an office at Cassville, Georgia. In 1855, in addition to conducting a

Slave Narrative of Mary Frances Webb

Location: McAlester, Oklahoma Age: 92 (deceased) Occupation: Field Hand Mary Frances Webb, grand daughter of Sarah Vest, aged 92, (deceased) McAlester, Okla. I’ve heard my grandmother tell a lot of her experiences during slavery. She remembered things well as she was a grown woman at the time of the war of the Rebellion. Her home was at Sedalia, Mo., and her owner was Baxter West, a prominent farmer and politician. He was very kind and good to his slaves. He provided them with plenty of food and good clothes. He would go to town and buy six or eight bolts

Biography of Hon. A. E. L. Gardner

Hon. A. E. L. Gardner, lawyer and lawmaker, representing the twenty-fifth senatorial district in the upper house of the general assembly, makes his home in Kirkwood but practices in Clayton and is also a representative of some of the more important corporations of St. Louis. He was born at Millersport, Ohio, December 4, 1867, and is a son of Thomas W. and Maria (Lindsey) Gardner, who were also natives of the Buckeye state. The father was engaged in mercantile business in Lancaster, Ohio, for many years and in 1879 came to Missouri, settling in Sedalia, where he engaged in merchandising

Biography of Henry C. Harring, D. C., PH. C.

Dr. Henry C. Harring, secretary and treasurer of the Missouri Chiropractic College and ‘a distinguished representative of his chosen profession, was born May 13, 1888, in Gasconade county, Missouri. His father, the late Henry W. Harring, was a native of Germany and came to America when a child of but four years o1 age, his parents settling in Gasconade county in 1840. There Henry W. Harring was reared and educated and after reaching adult age successfully engaged in farming and stock raising for many years. At the time of the Civil war he responded to the call of the Union

Biography of Frank L. Morse, M.D.

Dr. Frank L. Morse, a surgeon of St. Louis, was born in Savanna, Illinois, December 22, 1876, his parents being Charles and Amanda (Daniels) Morse. The father, a native of the state of New York, is descended from one of the families long represented in New York and previously in Massachusetts, a family of Dutch and English ancestry that was founded In America 1n colonial days. Charles Morse, removing westward, settled In Illinois in the early ’70s and in 1910 became a resident of Missouri. For many years he conducted a profitable lumber business but is now living retired. His

Biography of J. L. Raines

J. L. Raines.  The bankers of Kansas paid a significant honor to J. L. Raines in 1916 when they elected him president for the year of the Kansas State Bankers Association. Mr. Raines is a country banker, president of the Bank of Perry, and while most of his financial service had been rendered in connection with that institution his range of vision and judgment had not been confined by the limits of his experience. Mr. Raines took the lead in establishing and organizing the Bank of Perry in 1890, his principal associate being W. H. Huddleston, of Oskaloosa. It was

Biography of G. G. Wiechen

G. G. Wiechen, who came to Kansas over forty years ago, had found his best and most congenial activities in the line of grain merchandising. He is the leading grain merchant and elevator proprietor of Robinson, Kansas, where he had built up a large and successful business. Mr. Wiechen is a son of a veteran resident of Rush County, Kansas, J. H. Wiechen, who is still living, though past ninety years of age. J. H. Wiechen was born at Schweringen, Germany, in 1826. At the age of eighteen he came to America, living for a time in New York City

Biography of Robert E. McFarland

Robert E. McFarland, late incumbent of the responsible position of attorney general of Idaho, by his faithful and capable discharge of duty won the highest commendation. Thoroughly versed in the principles of jurisprudence, he was well fitted to handle the intricate problems which presented themselves for solution, and his success affords the best evidence of his capabilities. He is a native of Missouri, born in Independence, November 21, 1857. The family is of Scotch lineage, the first American ancestors having crossed the Atlantic in colonial days and actively participated in the events which form the history of that epoch. They