Location: Northumberland County PA

Biographical Sketch of Charles W. Goodlander

Charles W. Goodlander was an able and large hearted business man, and among other tributes to his benevolence is the Home for Children which he founded at Fort Scott. He was a Pennsylvanian of English-Quaker ancestry, born at Milton, April 25, 1834. He obtained a partial high school education and mastered and followed the carpenter’s trade in Ponnsylvania, Maryland, Indiana, Illinois and Missouri, before deciding to venture west of the Mississippi in his search for a location. Finally, in April, 1857, he arrived at Fort Scott, the first passenger to come from Kansas City by stage coach. Mr. Goodlander at

Saponi Indians

Saponi Tribe: Evidently a corruption of Monasiccapano or Monasukapanough, which, as shown by Bushnell, is probably derived in part from a native term “moni seep” signifying “shallow water.” Paanese is a corruption and in no way connected with the word “Pawnee.” Saponi Connections. The Saponi belonged to the Siouan linguistic family, their nearest relations being the Tutelo. Saponi Location. The earliest known location of the Saponi has been identified by Bushnell (1930) with high probability with “an extensive village site on the banks of the Rivanna, in Albemarle County, directly north of the University of Virginia and about one-half mile

Biography of S. E. Leinbach

S. E. Leinbach. Fifty years have passed since Mr. Leinbach became a resident of Kansas. He arrived in Pottawatomie County as a pioneer not long after the close of the Civil war, in which he had played a gallant part as a Union soldier. The war was the first great event in his life and his settlement in Kansas the second. Mr. Leinbach developed a homestead and had since acquired a large body of the fertile and valuable soil of Pottawatomie County. He is now living at Onaga and had been a public spirited factor in the progress of that

Biographical Sketch of John M. Hutchison

John M. Hutchison, druggist, was born in Northumberland County, Pa., March 13, 1842, moved to Stephenson County, Ill., came to Jewell County in 1871, and took a homestead. Engaged in the drug business in July, 1873. Was elected to the Kansas State Legislature in 1878. He is a member of the A. O. U. W., and the Odd Fellows lodges. He was married March 22, 1875, in Jewell City, Kan., to Miss Temperance Jordan. They have one child – Mary Leonora, born May 14, 1881.

Biographical Sketch of Harvey Edward Hackenberg

Hackenberg, Harvey Edward; manufacturer; born, Northumberland, Pa., March 8, 1864; son of Albert and Maria Brouse Hackenberg; public and high school education; married, Cleveland, June 18, 1903, Addie May Lawrence; one son, Edward Hackenberg, three years old; Republican in politics; 1881, clerk Tuttle, Masters & Co., iron ore merchants; 1883-1888, clerk The Bouton Carbon Co.; 1888-1899, sec’y The National Carbon Co. of Ohio; 1899-1911, treas. National Carbon Co. of Ohio and New Jersey; 1912, vice. pres., sec’y and treas. National Carbon Co. of New Jersey; sec’y, treas., vice pres. and director The National Carbon Co.; director, sec’y and treas. The

Biography of Dr. William Plunkett

Esther, daughter of John Harris, married Dr. William Plunkett, who was born in Ireland of noble family. In personal appearance he is described as of large stature, great muscular development and strength, while an imperious disposition was among his distinguishing mental traits. This is attested by several occurrences in his career which yet retain a place in the traditions of the locality which he afterward lived in Pennsylvania. On one occasion with several boon companions, he was engaged in some hilarious proceedings at an Irish inn. The adjoining room was occupied by an English nobleman, who had a curious and

Biographical Sketch of Isaac Richardson

(III) Margaret, daughter of Dr. William Plunkett, married Isaac Richardson, who removed from Sunbury, Pennsylvania, to Wayne county, New York, and became a very prominent citizen. Among their children was Isabella, mentioned elsewhere.

Saponi Tribe

Saponi Indians. One of the eastern Siouan tribes, formerly living in North Carolina and Virginia, but now extinct. The tribal name was occasionally applied to the whole group of Ft Christanna tribes, also occasionally included under Tutelo. That this tribe belonged to the Siouan stock has been placed beyond doubt by the investigations of Hale and Mooney. Their language appears to have been the same as the Tutelo to the extent that the people of the two tribes could readily understand each other. Mooney has shown that the few Saponi words recorded are Siouan. Lederer mentions a war in which

Oneida Chieftain Shikellamy

Oneida Chief Shikellamy

With To-re-wa-wa-kon ‘Paul Wallace’ as a guide, the Mohawks headed over a road, that once was an Indian trail, toward the north. Their route was over a beautiful country of hills and valleys. With their friend they soon reached the beautiful Susquehanna River Valley. At Sunbury, Pa. they visited the site of the cabin of old Chief Shikellamy. It was here that the great Oneida chief, the overseer of Vice-Gerent of the Delaware and other refugee Indians of the region lived. This was where his village, Shamokin, was located and where be spent most of his time from 1728 to