Location: Montgomery County KY

Biographical Sketch of Thomas Craddik

Thomas Craddick, a typical Kentuckian and a self-made man, now residing on his farm in Arcola Township, was born in Montgomery County, Kentucky, April 13, 1856, and is a son of Michael Craddick and Catherine (Welch) Craddick, who were natives of Ireland. His father emigrated from Kentucky to Arcola Township 1869 and died in 1890. His mother died in 1896, and they are both buried in the Arcola cemetery. Mr. Craddick’s farm contains one hundred and fourteen acres of land. He has never been married. Socially he is very popular and in business one of the substantial men of the

Biography of Robert M. Black

Robert M. Black, the subject of this memoir, came from an ancestry of more than ordinary importance and prominence. His great-grandfather, with his family, removed from Scotland and settled in Virginia some years before the Revolutionary war, caused by the traitor Arnold in portions of Virginia, volunteered, though far past the age of liability, for military service, and was one of the soldiers, who, under Lafayette and Gen. Wayne, turned and drove back Lord Cornwallis. He was intimately acquainted with Lafayette, Gen. Wayne and Gen. Lord Sterling, who were frequent guests at his house. His youngest son, George Black, the

Biographical Sketch of Presley Anderson

Presley Anderson and his wife, Elizabeth Steele, settled in Montgomery Co., Ky., in 1779. Their children were John A. S., James, William, Presley, Jr., Lucy, and Eliza. John A. S., better known as Captain Jack, was a remarkable man in his day, and is well remembered by the old citizens of Montgomery and Callaway counties. We give his history elsewhere. Presley, Jr., married Euphemia Jones, of Tennessee, and settled first in Warren Co., Mo., in 1814, from whence he removed to Montgomery County in 1817, and settled near Brush creek. He brought his family to Missouri on pack-horses, and they

Montgomery Co., Ky

MONTGOMERY CO. (Gladys Robertson) In this community most of the slaves were kept on farms and each family was given a well constructed log house. They were fed by provisions given them by their white masters and they were plentiful. They were clothed by their masters. These clothes were made by the colored women under the direction and supervision of their mistress, the white woman cut the clothes for both men and women, and the colored women did the sewing of the garments. The men did the manual labor on the farm and the women the domestic. Each white woman

Clark Co., Ky

CLARK CO. (Mayme Nunnelley) The first records of Slaves in Clark County was given by a descendant of one of the members of the little band of resolute Revolutionary soldiers who had been comrades and mess mates throughout the long bloody war. These fifteen families, some from Virginia and others from Maryland, started westward in the early spring of 1783 for Kentucky. They bought with them some horses, a few cattle, thirty or forty slaves and a few necessary household articles. After many hardships and trials, borne heroically by both men and women, they halted on the banks of the

Biography of David M. James

DAVID M. JAMES. There are few features of business enterprise which contribute a larger quota to the convenience of the residential and transient public than the well-appointed livery stable, and a valuable acquisition to the town of West Plains, Missouri, is the establishment of this kind owned and conducted by David M. James. This gentleman owes his nativity to Henry County, Kentucky, where he was born in 1833, a son of Dr. Beverly W. and Matilda (Day) James, natives of the old State of Virginia and Kentucky, respectively. When a young man Dr. James removed to Kentucky and was there

Biographical Sketch of Frank Wyatt

Frank Wyatt was a native of North Carolina, but settled and lived in Montgomery Co., Ky. He came to Missouri five times to look at the country, but could never make up his mind to move here. He had four sons John, Anthony, Douglass, and Joseph. John was a Captain in the war of 1812. He settled in Missouri in 1817, and married Attossa Sharp, by whom he had seven children John, Jr., Sarah, Harriet, Catharine, Margaret, Lucy, and Mary. Anthony came to Missouri in 1816. He married Mary Smith, daughter of Henry Smith and Nancy Davis (who were natives

Biographical Sketch of David Howard

David Howard, of Mount Sterling, Ky., married first to Margaret Fourt, and settled on Charrette creek, in Warren County, 1819. His children were James, Peter, Thomas, Polly, John, and Jackson. After the death of his first wife, Mr. Howard married the widow McCutchen, whose maiden name was Rebecca Caton. By her he had Elizabeth, George, and Naoma. Mr. Howard was a great hunter and sugar maker, and made the best maple sugar in the country. He was also a zealous Methodist, and his name is prominently identified with the early history of that church in his county. His son, John

Biographical Sketch of John Hutton

John Hutton, farmer; P.O. Diona; is one of the pioneers of this county, and after whom this township was named; he was born in Montgomery Co., Ky., Jan. 20, 1801; in the year 1816, his parents moved to Crawford Co:, Ill., where his father died January, 1819; his mother and family remained there until the year 1834, when they came to Coles Co., and settled on Sec. 20, where his mother died Nov., 1853, at the age of 77; Mr. Hutton still resides upon the homestead; he held the office of Supervisor the three first terms after the organization of

Montgomery County, Kentucky Census Records

1790 Montgomery County, Kentucky Census Records Free 1790 Census Form for your Research Hosted at Ancestry.com – 14 Days Free Hosted at Census Guide 1800 U.S. Census Guide 1800 Montgomery County, Kentucky Census Records Free 1800 Census Form for your Research Hosted at Ancestry.com – 14 Days Free Hosted at Census Guide 1800 U.S. Census Guide 1810 Montgomery County, Kentucky Census Records Free 1810 Census Form for your Research Hosted at Ancestry.com – 14 Days Free Hosted at SK Publications Census Index Hosted at Census Guide 1810 U.S. Census Guide 1820 Montgomery County, Kentucky Census Records Free 1820 Census Form