Location: Madison County KY

Kit Carson, His Life and Adventures – Indian Wars

The subject of this sketch, Christopher “Kit” Carson, was born on the 24th of December, 1809, in Madison County, Kentucky. The following year his parents removed to Howard County, Missouri, then a vast prairie tract and still further away from the old settlements.

Biography of Jebez Ham

Jabez Ham, brother of John, was born in Madison Co., Ky., in 1797, and came to Missouri in 1817. He had no education, was of a roving disposition, and did nothing for several years but hunt and fish. His mind was naturally bright, and if he had been educated he would have made a remarkable man. Rev. Aley Snethen and Lewis Jones taught him the alphabet and learned him to read, and in 1824 he began to preach, having united with the Old or Hard Shell Baptist Church. In 1826 he organized a church of that denomination on Loutre Creek,

Biography of Stephen Ham

Stephen Ham lived and died in Madison Co., Ky. He was the father of John, Jabez, and Stephen Ham, Jr. John was born in Kentucky in 1786, and came to Missouri in 1809, and settled in St. Charles County. He joined Nathan Boone’s company of rangers, and served during the Indian war. In 1816 he and Jonathan Crow built a bark tent on Auxvasse creek, now in Callaway County, and lived in it for some time, while they were engaged in hunting. They were, therefore, probably the first American settlers within the limits of Callaway County. Ham cut his name

Biographical Sketch of David Gentry

David Gentry, of Virginia, married Jane Kendrick, and settled in Madison County, Ky. They had Bright B., Pleasant, David, Dickey, Martin, Bailey, and five daughters. Bright B. married Martha Jones, and they had James, Margaret, David, Jonathan J., Eliza, Susan, Albert, and Fanny. David settled in Montgomery County in 1833, and married Polly A. Groom. Jonathan also settled in Montgomery County in 1833, and married Elizabeth McFarland.

Biographical Sketch of Joseph McFarland

Joseph McFarland, of Ireland, came to America before the revolution, and settled at Norfolk, Va. He joined the American army when the war broke out, and was killed in battle. He left a widow and one son, Robert, who settled in Madison Co., Ky., where he married Rhoda Quick, and they had Sarah, Joseph, and Rachel. Mr. McFarland’s first wife died, and he subsequently married Eva Farmer, of Virginia, by whom he had-Eleanor, Lucinda, Elizabeth, Permelia, Eliza, and Robert. Joseph McFarland settled in Montgomery County in 1825. He married. Polly Cundiff. Lucinda married James McGarvin, of Montgomery County. Eliza married

Biography of Stephen Best

Stephen Best, of Ireland, emigrated to America many years before the revolution, and settled in Pennsylvania. His children were Isaac, Humphrey, Stephen, Jr., and Ebenezer. He also had several daughters, but their names are lost. Ebenezer never married, but he educated sixty children that claimed him for their father. He was one of the celebrated horse racers of Madison Co., Ky., and also indulged in chicken fighting. He once fought ten times with his chickens in one day, and gained seven of the fights, winning $1,000 each. Isaac Best and his wife came to Missouri in 1808, from Garrard Co.,

Biography of Gideon Bowels

Gideon Bowles and wife, of Dublin, Ireland, were members of the St. James Colony that settled in Goochland Co., Va. Anderson Bowles, their son, married Jane Thomas, and settled in Cumberland Co., Va. Their children were Caleb, Sarah, James, Gideon, Ann, Anderson, Jr., Virginia, Elizabeth, Augusta, and David. Ann and Gideon died in Virginia. The rest of the children came with their parents to Madison Co., Ky., in 1806, and in 1811 they all settled in St. Louis Co., Mo., where Mr. Bowles died the following year. His widow lived until 1834. Caleb the eldest son was Judge of the

Biographical Sketch of Daniel White

Daniel White, son of Samuel White, was born near the city of Richmond, in Madison County, Kentucky, February 26, 1831. He remained in his birthplace until he was about twenty-one years of age, during which time he was engaged in farming and working for his father. After becoming of age he was engaged in farming for two years, and then worked in a mill three years. August 9, 1862, he was enrolled in Company F, Seventh Kentucky Cavalry, and was in the service during the war, being in several battles and skirmishes. After the war Mr. White moved to Tazewell

Slave Narrative of Richard Miller

Interviewer: Anna Pritchett Person Interviewed: Richard Miller Location: Indiana Place of Birth: Danville, Kentucky Date of Birth: January 12, 1843 Place of Residence: 1109 North West Street Federal Writers’ Project of the W.P.A. District #6 Marion County Anna Pritchett 1200 Kentucky Avenue FOLKLORE RICHARD MILLER-AN OLD SOLDIER 1109 North West Street Richard Miller was born January 12, 1843 in Danville, Kentucky. His mother was an English subject, born in Bombay, India and was brought into America by a group of people who did not want to be under the English government. They landed in Canada, came on to Detroit, stayed

Clark Co., Ky

CLARK CO. (Mayme Nunnelley) The first records of Slaves in Clark County was given by a descendant of one of the members of the little band of resolute Revolutionary soldiers who had been comrades and mess mates throughout the long bloody war. These fifteen families, some from Virginia and others from Maryland, started westward in the early spring of 1783 for Kentucky. They bought with them some horses, a few cattle, thirty or forty slaves and a few necessary household articles. After many hardships and trials, borne heroically by both men and women, they halted on the banks of the

Slave Narrative of Belle Robinson

Interviewer: Eliza Ison Person Interviewed: Belle Robinson Location: Garrard County, Kentucky Place of Birth: Garrard County, Kentucky Date of Birth: June 3rd, 1853 I found Aunt Belle sitting on the porch, dressed nice and clean with a white handkerchief pinned on her neck. When I went to her and told her who I was and the reason for my visit her face beamed with smiles and she said “Lawdy, it has been so long that I have forgot nearly everything I knew”. Further investigation soon proved that she had not forgotten, for her statements were very intelligent. She was working

Slave Narrative of Peter Bruner

Interviewer: Evelyn McLemore Person Interviewed: Peter Bruner Date of Interview: 1936 Location: Kentucky Place of Birth: Winchester, Kentucky, Clark Co. Date of Birth: 1845 ESTILL CO. (Evelyn McLemore) Story of Peter Bruner, a former slave: Peter Bruner, was born in Winchester, Kentucky, Clark Co., in 1845. His master was John Bell Bruner, who at that time treated him fairly well. When Peter was 10 years of age his master brought him and his sister to Irvine. After arriving in Irvine, Peter’s master was very cruel to him. They got only cornbread, fat meat and water to eat. If his master’s

Slave Narrative of Dan Bogie

Interviewer: Eliza Ison Person Interviewed: Dan Bogie Location: Garrard County, Kentucky Date of Interview: May 5, 1858 Garrard County. Ex-Slave Stories. (Eliza Ison) [HW: Ky 9] Uncle Dan tells me “he was born May 5, 1858 at the Abe Wheeler place near Spoonsville, now known as Nina, about nine miles due east from Lancaster. Mother, whose name was Lucinda Wheeler, belonged to the Wheeler family. My father was a slave of Dan Bogie’s, at Kirksville, in Madison County, and I was named for him. My mother’s people were born in Garrard County as far as I know. I had one

Biography of James Sidney Rollins

James Sidney Rollins, lawyer and statesman, distinguished for extraordinary public services, was born April 19, 1812, at Richmond, Kentucky, and died at Columbia, Missouri, January 9, 1888, in the seventy-sixth year of his age. His parents were Anthony Wayne and Sallie Harris (Rodes) Rollins. The father was a native of Pennsylvania, a graduate of Jefferson College in that state and an eminent physician. He was a son of Henry Rollins, who was born in County Tyrone, Ireland, emigrated to America during the Revolutionary war, enlisted in the Continental army and fought in the battle of Brandywine. The mother, a lady

Biography of James William Bell

James William Bell, a resident of Topeka for more than thirty years, has built up a business and reputation as a buyer and dealer in horses which is by no means confined to the State of Kansas. His operations extend practically over the entire country. He has been a prominent exporter to foreign markets. James William Bell was born in Greenbrier County in what is now West Virginia but was then Virginia, December 18, 1854. The Bell family goes back to Scotch-Irish antecedents and the first of the name came to Virginia in colonial times. David Henderson Bell, father of

Biographical Sketch of Irving L. Daniels

Daniels, Irving L.; civil engineer; born, Oberlin, O., June 26, 1877; son of Theodore F. and Julia H. Lewis Daniels; educated public and high school, Lorain, O., Berea College, Berea, Ky., and Oberlin College, Oberlin, O.; married, Cleveland, O., Della E. Holmden; two sons, 9 and 3 years of age; member Sons of Veterans, Lookout Camp, No. 466, and Cleveland Commandery, Uniform Rank Sons of Veterans; member the Old Stone Church (1st Presbyterian); member the Cleveland Chamber of Industry; for five years in Engineering Dept., L. S. & M. S. R. R., in the Toledo Division; on county work for

Biographical Sketch of Edward Williams

Edward Williams, of North Carolina, went to Kentucky with Daniel Boone, and lived for some time at Boonesborough, where he married Jemima Anderson, daughter of Major Jack Anderson. Their children were Daniel, Joshua, Pernell, Casper, Susan, and Caleb. The latter married Elizabeth Woodland, of Kentucky, and settled in Warren County in 1818. They had nine children William, Dulcinea, Laurel, Abihue, Heath, Jane, Zuima, Elizabeth, and Caleb C. Dulcinea Married Everett Creech, who settled in Warren County in 1819. Jane married William Guerdo, son of Jared D. Guerdo, who settled in St. Charles County in 1806. Elizabeth married William Anderson, who

Biography of Jeremiah Hampton Squires

Jeremiah Hampton Squires. One of the old and honored residents of Topeka, to which city he came thirty-seven years ago, is Jeremiah Hampton Squires, veteran of the Civil war, who is now living in comfortable retirement after a long and useful career as a business man and public official. Mr. Squires was born at Southampton, on Long Island, New York, September 11, 1842, and is the only survivor of the four children of Jeremiah and Phoebe (Jaegger) Squires, who were farming people. Mr. Squires resided on the home farm on Long Island until reaching the age of seventeen years, and

Reece, W. J. Mrs. – Obituary

Enterprise, Wallowa County, Oregon Mrs. W.J. Reece passed away in Enterprise, Thursday, June 21, 1934, after an illness of more than a year. She had been helpless for some time but had suffered little physical pain and the end came very peacefully. Funeral services were held in the Christian church Sunday and burial was in the Enterprise cemetery. Rev. B.F. Miller conducted the services. Margaret Ann Cox was born in Madison county, Kentucky, December 5, 1870, and grew to womanhood there. She moved to Illinois where she united in marriage to W.J. Reece December 20, 1891. To this union were

Biography of Ira B. Oldham, M. D.

Dr. Ira B. Oldham, who for eighteen years has engaged in the practice of medicine and surgery in Muskogee and whose ability and wide knowledge lie behind the substantial success that he has achieved, was born on a farm in Madison county, Kentucky, March 2, 1871, his parents being William Kavanaugh and J. Catherine (Brown) Oldham, both of whom were representatives of old southern families early established in Virginia. Dr. Oldham’s father was born in Madison county, Kentucky, but his grandfather, Hezekiah Oldham, was born in Caswell county, North Carolina, and was a son of Captain John Oldham, an American