Location: Hartford Connecticut

Andrews Wakelee 1650 1947

Andrews and Wakelee Families of Waterbury Connecticut 1650-1947

Andrews and Wakelee 1650-1947 manuscript provides a brief genealogy of the descendants of John and Mary Andruss of Hartford Connecticut through their son Abraham, one of the 30 original families of Mattatuck, afterward called Waterbury. The second part of the Andrews and Wakelee 1650-1947 manuscript provides the descendants of Henry and Sarah Wakelee of Hartford Connecticut, through their son Ebenezer, who also settled in Waterbury.

Some descendants of Thomas Rowley of Windsor Connecticut

Some Descendants of Thomas Rowley of Windsor, Connecticut

Title: Some descendants of Thomas Rowley of Windsor, Connecticut, with lineage of families allied by marriage Author: Mildred Gertrude Rowley Crankshaw Publication date: 1961-1965 Publisher: Digitizing sponsor: Internet Archive Contributor: Allen County Public Library Genealogy Center Repository Internet Archive Read Book Download PDF Some descendants of Thomas Rowley of Windsor. Thomas Rowley. Thomas Rowley (Rowell) a cordwainer, was in Windsor Connecticut as early as 1662, and Simsbury Connecticut by 1670. He died 1 May, 1705/8, estate inventory dated 1 May 1708. Married at Windsor, 5 May, 1669 by Rev. Wolcott, Mary Denslow, daughter of Henry, Windsor, born 10 Aug. 1651,

Mason Machine Works - Mason Machine Works, Taunton, Massachusetts, 1899 Catalog

Ancestors of William Mason of Taunton, Massachusetts

It is to the life and paternal lineage of the late William Mason of Taunton that this article is directed, he being a direct descendant from one of the old pioneers and Indian fighters of this section in its early settlement – Major John Mason, of Pequot fame, from whom William Mason’s descent is through Daniel, Peter, Japhet, Japhet Mason (2) and Amos Mason.

J. R. Bronson

Ancestors of John Richardson Bronson of Attleboro, MA

JOHN RICHARDSON BRONSON, M. D., who for over half a century was one of the best known practitioners of medicine in southern Massachusetts and part of Rhode Island, and who for upward of fifty years was a resident of Attleboro, was a native of Connecticut, born in the town of Middlebury, New Haven county, June 5, 1829, son of Garry and Maria (Richardson) Bronson.

The Bronson family was early planted in the New World. John Bronson (early of record as Brownson and Brunson) was early at Hartford. He is believed, though not certainly known, to have been one of the company who came in 1636 with Mr. Hooker, of whose church he was a member. He was a soldier in the Pequot battle of 1637. He is not named among the proprietors of Hartford in the land division of 1639; but is mentioned in the same year in the list of settlers, who by the “towne’s courtesie” had liberty “to fetch woods and keepe swine or cowes on the common.” His house lot was in the “soldiers’ field,” so called, in the north part of the old village of Hartford, on the “Neck Road” (supposed to have been given for service in the Pequot war), where he lived in 1640. He moved, about 1641 to Tunxis (Farmington) He was deputy from Farmington in May, 1651, and at several subsequent sessions, and the “constable of Farmington” in 1652. He was one of the seven pillars at the organization of the Farmington Church in 1652. His name is on the list of freemen of Farmington in 1669. He died Nov. 28, 1680.

Descendants of Isaac Benjamin of New Bedford, MA

The New Bedford Benjamin family here considered – some of the descendants of Isaac Benjamin, one of whose sons, the late Isaac W. Benjamin, was for years officially identified with the New Bedford Cordage Company and a public servant of the city of New Bedford of rare fidelity and usefulness – is a branch of the Livermore, Maine, family of the name and it of the still earlier family of Watertown, Mass., where arrived John Benjamin Sept. 16, 1632, in the ship “Lion.”

Irving Washington

Washington Irving at Fort Gibson, 1832

The McIntosh Creeks had been located along Arkansas River near the Verdigris on fertile timbered land which they began at once to clear, cultivate, and transform into productive farms. The treaty of 1828 with the Cherokee gave the latter a great tract of land on both sides of Arkansas River embracing that on which the Creeks were located. This was accomplished by a blunder of the Government officials, in the language of the Secretary of War, 1U.S. House, Executive Documents, 22d congress, first session, no. 116, President’s Message submitting the memorial of the Creek Indians. “when we had not a

Collections of the Connecticut Historical Society

Collections of the Connecticut Historical Society

From 1860 to 1930 The Connecticut Historical Society published a series containing items from their collection of historical documents. The following are 30 volumes of their works freely made available online. To assist the researcher with determining the contents for each volume, we’ve included such in the description. Connecticut genealogists will want to pay particular attention to Volumes 8-10, 12, 14, and 22. Willis and Wyllys family researchers, who descend from George Wyllys will be ecstatic over volume 21. And to our Native American friends, volumes 2 and 3 contain some information on early Connecticut Indians.

Lewis Family Genealogy

William Lewis Genealogy

Professor K. O. Thompson, author of the Lewis Family Genealogy descended the family tree through the line of Nathaniel Lewis, son of William Lewis and Mary Cheevers, for nine total generations in this free manuscript. If you descend from Nathaniel Lewis or William Lewis then this rare manuscript could be quite valuable to you.

Hardships of the Early Natchez Emigrants

Taking the reader with us, to the settlements of the distant Natchez region, he will find that emigrants continued to pour in, upon those fertile hills and alluvial bottoms, from all parts of “his majesty’s Atlantic plantations.” Many were the hardships and perils they encountered, in reaching this remote and comparatively uninhabited region. It is believed that the history of one party of these emigrants will enable the reader to understand what kind of hardships and deprivations all the others were forced to undergo. Major General Phineas Lyman, a native of Durham, a graduate of Yale, a distinguished lawyer, and