Location: Halifax Nova Scotia Canada

Narrative of Robert Eastburn – Indian Captivities

A Faithful Narrative of the Many Dangers and Sufferings, as well as wonderful and surprising deliverances, of Robert Eastburn, during his late captivity among the Indians. Written by Himself. Published at the earnest request of many persons, for the benefit of the Public. With a recommendatory Preface by the Rev. Gilbert Tennent. Psalms 24, 6, 7, and 193, 2, 4. Philadelphia: Printed. Boston: Reprinted and sold by Green & Russell, opposite the Probate Office in Queen street, 1753. Preface Candid Reader: The author (and subject) of the ensuing narrative (who is a deacon of our church, and has been so

The Citadel at Halifax, Nova Scotia

The province of Acadia had been in English possession for nearly half a century when, in 1749, the powers that were in the Mother Country decided that Annapolis, the little gamecock city of the peninsula, whose history went back to 1605, was not a fitting place for the capital of the province. Its harbor, while beautiful and secure, was not large enough for the purposes that England had in mind; moreover, it was on the western side of the peninsula, so that to get to it from Europe one must pass around Cape Sable and up the foggy Bay of

Biography of Roderick H. Tait

Roderick H. Tait, president of the Tait & Nordmeyer Engineering Company of St. Louis, was born in Halifax, Nova Scotia, March 31, 1866, and is a son of George and Cynthia A. (Tupper) Tait. The father, now deceased, was a native of Scotland and a cabinet-maker by trade. During the last twenty years of his life he was a resident of Halifax. His wife, a native of Canada, was born in Nova Scotia, and is still living. Their family numbered nine children, five sons and four daughters, of whom Roderick H. was the third In order of birth. In the

Biography of Donald W. McLeod

Donald W. Mcleod is one of the prominent and well-known citizens of Riverside and has been identified with many of the leading public enterprises of the colony for the decade of years preceding 1890. Mr. McLeod is a native of Nova Scotia, born at Scotsburn, Pictou County, November 18, 1841. His parents, Duncan R. and Annie (Fraser) McLeod, were of Scotch descent. Mr. McLeod was reared upon his father’s farm, and early in life became familiar with the practical duties of farm life. He was given the advantages of a good education, and at nineteen years of age graduated at

Biography of Wellsford E. West

Among the horticultural industries well worthy of mention is that of Mr. West, conducted upon a twenty-acre tract, located on the west side of Magnolia avenue, between Jackson and Van Buren, about six miles south of Riverside. Mr. West came to this place in 1884, and in July of the next year purchased his present home, and entered upon horticultural pursuits. The place was planted with trees and vines and partially improved in buildings. He commenced a thorough cultivation and fertilization, and added to that a vigorous pruning systematically applied, that has produced wonderful results, and today his groves and

Aspenquid

Aspenquid. An Abnaki of Agamenticus, Maine, forming a curious figure in New England tradition. He is said to have been born toward the end of the 16th century and converted to Christianity, to have preached it to the Indians, traveled much, and died among his own people at the age of about 100 years. Up to 1775-76 Aspenquid’s day was celebrated in Halifax, Nova Scotia, by a clam dinner. He is said to be buried on the slope of Mt. Agamenticus, where he is reported to have appeared in 1682. He is thought by some to be identical with Passaconaway.

Biographical Sketch of Arthur J. Taylor

ARTHUR J. TAYLOR. – The subject of this sketch, whose portrait appears herein, was born in Staffordshire, England, on the 18th of August, 1857 When but two years of age his parents brought him to America, locating at Richmond, Virginia. Their residence there was but brief, as they soon removed to Halifax, Nova Scotia, perhaps anticipating the political troubles of the next few years. When but a boy of twelve, Arthur came West, upon his own responsibility, to the Red River of the North, where he lived until 1884. His next move, in April of that year, made him a