Location: Green Bay Wisconsin

Map of Pontiacs War

Chief Pontiac of the Ottawa’s

Immediately after the peace of 1763 all the French forts in the west as far as Green Bay were garrisoned with English troops; and the Indians now began to realize, but too late, what they had long apprehended the selfish designs of both French and English threatening destruction, if not utter annihilation, to their entire race. These apprehensions brought upon the theatre of Indian warfare, at that period of time, the most remarkable Indian in the annals of history, Pontiac, the chief of the Ottawa’s and the principal sachem of the Algonquin Confederacy. He was not only distinguished for his

Early Exploration and Native Americans

De Soto and his band gave to the Choctaws at Moma Binah and the Chickasaws at Chikasahha their first lesson in the white man’s modus operandi to civilize and Christianize North American Indians; so has the same lesson been continued to be given to that unfortunate people by his white successors from that day to this, all over this continent, but which to them, was as the tones of an alarm-bell at midnight. And one hundred and twenty-three years have passed since our forefathers declared all men of every nationality to be free and equal on the soil of the North

Narrative of Angelique Langlade

The concluding narrative of these personal recollections is that of Angelique Langlade, still living in Penetanguishene at an advanced age, and the last survivor but one of a somewhat noted family. Her command of English is very limited, but her mixed dialect so picturesque and pointed, that I am constrained to present it almost verbatim, in her own simple but expressive style, with apologies to several writers of dialect literature. Ma name, Angelique Langlade; born Drummon Islan; me Chippawa half-breed; ma mudder, Josephine Ah-quah-dah, Chippawa squaw, Yankee tribe; ma fadder, Charles Langlade, French half-breed, hees born Mackinaw, an move Drummon Islan

Treaty of July 29, 1829

Articles of a treaty made and concluded at Prairie du Chien, in the Territory of Michigan, between the United States of America, by their Commissioners, General John McNeil, Colonel Pierre Menard, and Caleb Atwater, Esq. and the United Nations of Chippewa, Ottawa, and Potawatamie Indians, of the waters of the Illinois, Milwaukee, and Manitoouck Rivers. Article 1. The aforesaid nations of Chippewa, Ottawa, and Potawatamie Indians, do hereby cede to the United States aforesaid, all the lands comprehended within the following limits, to wit: Beginning at the Winnebago Village, on Rock river, forty miles from its mouth, and running thence

Menominee Indians

Menominee Indians were located on and near the Menominee River, Wisconsin, and in Michigan on or about the present location of Mackinac. The Menominee belonged to the Algonquian linguistic family and to the same section as the Cree and Foxes.

Biography of H. A. Hansen

H.A. HANSEN. – Among the enterprising and industrious agriculturists of Union county, mention should be made of the gentleman, whose name initiates this paragraph, since his energy and ability have been manifest to all and since he has distinguished himself by his faithfulness and success that he has attained in tilling the soil and in raising stock. He is also popular among his fellows for they have again and again manifested their confidence in him at the polls and have kept him in public office almost continuously for the last decade. The pleasant little Kingdom of Denmark has furnished many

Goebel, John P. – Obituary

John Peter Goebel of Baldwin, Kansas, brother of Tony Goebel, of Enterprise, passed away in Lawrence, Kansas, March 11, 1957, and his body is being brought to Wallowa for burial. Recitation of Rosary was at 8:30 last evening, March 13, at Lawrence, and arrangements have been made by the Booth-Bollman funeral home for requiem mass to be offered by Father John Baumgartner at St. Margaret’s Catholic Church in Wallowa Monday, March 18, at 10 a.m. Burial will be in the Catholic section of the Wallowa cemetery. The deceased was born November 17, 1876, in Green Bay, Wisconsin, son of John

Hetrick, Anna Margaretta – Obituary

Anna Margaretta “Maggie” Hetrick, a resident of Wallowa County most of her life, died March 20, 1982, at Valley View Manor in La Grande, one week before her 100th birthday. Born in Green Bay, Wisconsin on March 27, 1882, she was the daughter of Peter and Gertrude Anna Huber Goebel and the oldest of 10 children. The family moved to Wallowa County from Humbolt County, Wisconsin, in 1888. On November 27, 1907, she was married to Calvin Hetrick in Wallowa, and she spent her adult life as a homemaker. Her husband died in 1938. During World War II Mrs. Hetrick

Bailey, Hattie Sadie Anderson – Obituary

Funeral services for Hattie Sadie Bailey, 2432 11th Street, 79, were conducted April 26, at the Beatty Chapel. The pastor Joe Jewell officiated with interment following in the family plot at Mt. Hope Cemetery. Mrs. Bailey passed away on Saturday, April 23rd at the Blue Mountain Nursing Home in Prairie City, Oregon after an extended illness. Mrs. Bailey was born on August 19th, 1886, at Green Bay, Wisconsin, the daughter of Hans and Olga Anderson. She came to Baker in 1909 and had lived here since that time with the exception of the past year which she had lived with

Sauk Tribe

Sauk Indians, Sac Indians, Sac Tribe ( Osā’kiwŭg, ‘people of the outlet,’ or, possibly, ‘people of the yellow earth,’ in contradistinction from the Muskwakiwuk, ‘Red Earth People’, a name of the Foxes). One of a number of Algonquian tribes whose earliest known habitat was embraced within the eastern peninsula of Michigan, the other tribes being the Potawatomi, the “Nation of the Fork,” and probably the famous Mascoutens and the Foxes. The present name of Saginaw Bay (Sāginā’we’, signifying ‘the country or place of the Sauk’) is apparently derived from the ethnic appellative Sauk. There is presumptive evidence that the Sauk,