Location: Fitzwilliam New Hampshire

General History of Fitzwilliam NH

FITZWILLIAM, one of the southern tier of townships in the county, lies in lat. 42° 45 and long. 4° 54′, bounded north by Troy and Jaffrey, east by Jaffrey and Rindge, south by the state line, and west by Richmond. The town was originally granted by the Masonion proprietors, as Monadnock No. 4, January 15, 1752, to Roland Cotton and forty-one others. These grantees, however, failed to comply with the requirements of the charter and thus forfeited their right to the territory, and it was subsequently, early in 1765, rE.granted to Samson Stoddard and twenty-three associates. On May 19, 1773,

Fitzwilliam Village Cheshire County NH

FITZWILLIAM is a pleasant post village located in the northern-central part of the town, on six main roads. Besides the usual mechanic shops, and stores, it has a savings bank, three church organizations, town hall, two hotels, and several granite shops and quarries.

Industry of Fitzwilliam NH

Fitzwilliam Savings bank, located in the Postoffice block, at Fitzwilliam village, was incorporated in 1871, and commenced business in 1872, with Philip S. Batchellor, president, and Milton Chaplin, treasurer. The present officers are Amos J. Blake, president, and Stephen Batchellor, treasurer. George D. Webb Granite Co.’s quarry and shops are located at the crossing of the railroad and road 31. The firm consists of George D. Webb and C. F. Batchelder, of Worcester, Mass., who began work here in July, 1882. They have extensive sheds, a polishing-mill, blacksmiths shops and enginehouse, using three engines and two steam drills. Their works

Early Settlers of Fitzwilliam NH

The name of the grantees of 1765 were as follows: Sampson Stoddard, Nathaniel Treadwell, Thomas Spaulding, Benjamin Edwards, Jacob Treadwell, Jr., Matthew Thornton, Nathaniel Brooks, David Millen, Jonathan Lovewell, John Honey, John Stevens, John Woods, William Earl Treadwell Paul March, Charles Treadwell, Edmund Grouard, Jonathan Blanchard, Sampson Stoddard, Jr., Abel Lawrence, James Reed, Benjamin Bellows, George Libbey, Jonathan Willson and Jeremiah Libbey. The first meeting of the grantees of which a record exists, after the lots had been drawn, was held at the house of Thomas Harwood, in Dunstable, Monday, May 20, 1765, when Sampson Stoddard, Esq., was chosen moderator,

Biographical Sketch of John Shirley

John Shirley, a soldier of the Revolution, was born on board ship coming from England, and was brought up in Boston. He came to Fitzwilliam about 1780, settling in the village, and married Submit Bogle, of Sudbury, Mass. He reared a family of nine children, and died at the age of ninety-three, in the house where his grandson, William H., now lives. His son, Henry, was born in the town, held the office of selectman several years, and died at the same place his father did, at the age of seventy-two. William H., son of Henry, was born in the

Biographical Sketch of Silas Fife

Silas Fife came to Troy from Bolton. Mass., and settled in the eastern part of the town. He was a farmer, had a family of ten children, and died there in 1834. His son, Timothy, a native of Troy, remained there until his death, December 12, 1872, in his eightieth year. Daniel J., son of Timothy, also a native of Troy, came to Fitzwilliam in 1877, and located on road 49 1/2.

Fitzwilliam Depot, Cheshire County NH

FITZWILLIAM DEPOT, a post village located in the central part of the town,, on the Cheshire railroad, contains one church, a few mechanic shops, stores, etc.

Biographical Sketch of Ezra Hayden

Ezra Hayden, a native of Sudbury, Mass., came here about 1804 or 1805. locating upon the farm where Ethan Blodgett now lives. He removed to the place now owned by Eli Smith, where he died in 1843, at the age of fiftyeight years. His son, Otis, was born here where he has lived most of his life. His residence is on road 37.