Location: Cook County IL

Keller, Anna Mueller – Obituary

Anna Keller (nee Mueller), beloved wife of the late George Keller, fond mother of Joseph, Anna, Edward, Richard, George, and Mrs. Kripner; sister of the late Jacob Mueller, sister-in-law of John Keller.  Funeral Tuesday, November 22, 1927 at 10 a.m. from her late residence 4501 N. Longdale to our Lady of Victory Church.  Interment at Joseph Cemetery.  Seattle Washington papers please copy.  1Anna’s son Joseph lived in Seattle.  Anna died November 18, 1927. Chicago Tribune, November 20, 1927 Contributed by:  Shelli Steedman Footnotes:   [ + ] 1. ↩ Anna’s son Joseph lived in Seattle.  Anna died November 18, 1927.

Ellithorpe, Erie – Obituary

Erie E. Ellithorpe, at his residence, 6122 Prairie Ave.  Funeral Friday, March 12 [1915] at 2:30.  Interment at Mount Hope.  [Erie was survived by his wife Lillian Pegg] Contributed by:  Shelli Steedman

Coughlan, Lois M. Keller – Obituary

Lois M. Coughlan, 72, of Arlington Heights was a clinical nutritionist for the past 50 years, most recently working a as a renal dietitian at Total Renal Care Inc., Chicago, since 1995.  Mrs. Coughlan was previously a nutritionist at Lutheran General Hospital, Park Ridge, since the 1970s and at Resurrection Medical Center in Chicago from the early 1960s to the 1970s. Mrs. Coughlan, a Chicago native, died Monday, April 10, in her home.  In 1949 Mrs. Coughlan received a bachelor’s degree in dietetics at College of St. Teresa, Winona, Minn.  She completed an internship in dietetics at Henry Ford Hospital

Coughlan, John Edward – Obituary

John E. Coughlan of Arlington Hts.; beloved husband of Lois M.; fond father of John, Dan, Julie, Mary, Tom and Billy; loving son of Gertrude and the late Dr. Donald Coughlan; dear brother of Marianna Bowen, Donald, Robert, Merritt and James Coughlan.  Visitation Monday 3-5 and 7-10 p.m. at Lauterburg and Oehler Funeral Home, 2000 E. Northwest Hwy., Arlington Hts.  Funeral Tuesday 9:30 a.m. from Chapel to St. James Church, Mass 10 a.m.  Interment All Saints Cemetery.  [Died December 29, 1972] Chicago Tribune, December 31, 1972 Contributed by:  Shelli Steedman

Chandler Family of Boston and East Bridgewater MA

This Boston – East Bridgewater Chandler family, the head of which was the late Hon. Peleg Whitman Chandler, long one of the leading counselors of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts, and one of a family of lawyers, comes of a Massachusetts-Maine branch of the ancient Duxbury family whose progenitor was Edmund Chandler. The branch just alluded to for several generations at New Gloucester and Bangor, Maine, and at Boston in this Commonwealth, has been one of liberal education, college-bred men, men who have adorned the legal profession, and it has allied itself through generations with a number of the ancient and first families of the Old Colony. There follows in chronological order from Edmund Chandler, the first American ancestor of this branch of American Chandlers, and in detail the family history and genealogy.

John Brickey

The Brickey House of Prairie du Rocher Illinois

Nearly every town has an old house with an interesting story. Prairie du Rocher has several, one of which was the Brickey house. Unoccupied for many years, this large three-story, square-framed house with its wide porches, stained glass, shuttered windows, and mansard roof attracted the attention of the most casual visitor to the village. It stood among large trees of a generous plot of ground below the bluff, it silently proclaimed the hospitality that once was known there. The fine iron fence that enclosed the grounds emphasized its air of detachment.

Charles Montezuma

There always have existed among the North American Indians, and still exist, many examples of intellectual ability, of genius, of high moral feeling and as noble and pure patriotism as was ever found in any nation of people and as proof of this fact I relate the following: Some twenty-five years ago a photographer of Chicago, being in Arizona on a vacation trip, found and rescued from an Apache camp an abandoned Indian male infant of full blood. The photographer became possessed with a desire to take the boy home with him and adopt him. In spite of warnings that the

The Illinois Indians – Indian Wars

Some years ago there was deposited in the Archives of the “Historical Society” of Chicago a record in reference to the history of the Illinois Indians, a portion of which is interesting as connected with this matter. It was deposited by Judge Caton, who became a citizen of Chicago thirty-nine years ago, when the whole country was occupied as the hunting grounds of the Pottowattomie tribe. Their chief, Shabboni, died in 1849, the only remnant of this once powerful tribe. Of him it could be truth-fully said he was the last of his race. Comparatively not long since the surrounding

Black Hawk

Black Hawk’s War – Indian Wars

We have now to record the events of a war “which brought one of the noblest of Indians to the notice and admiration of the people of the United States. Black Hawk was an able and patriotic chief. With the intelligence and power to plan a great project, and to execute it, he united the lofty spirit which secures the respect and confidence of a people. He was born about the year 1767, on Rock river, Illinois. At the age of fifteen he took a scalp from the enemy, and was in consequence promoted by his tribe to the rank

Mary Victoria Leiter

Mary Victoria Leiter, Baroness Curzon of Kedleston

For the second time within the century an American woman has risen to viceregal honors. Mary Caton, the granddaughter of Charles Carroll of Carrollton and the widow of Robert Patterson, of Baltimore, through her marriage, in 1825, to the Marquis of Wellesley, who was at the time Viceroy of Ireland, went to reign a queen in the country whence her ancestors, more than a century before, had emigrated to America. In Mary Victoria Leiter, whose life, to the people of a future generation, will read much like romance, we again behold an American woman, who, like the Marchioness of Wellesley