Location: Augusta County VA

An Artists rendition of James Smith

Life and travels of Colonel James Smith – Indian Captivities

James Smith, pioneer, was born in Franklin county, Pennsylvania, in 1737. When he was eighteen years of age he was captured by the Indians, was adopted into one of their tribes, and lived with them as one of themselves until his escape in 1759. He became a lieutenant under General Bouquet during the expedition against the Ohio Indians in 1764, and was captain of a company of rangers in Lord Dunmore’s War. In 1775 he was promoted to major of militia. He served in the Pennsylvania convention in 1776, and in the assembly in 1776-77. In the latter year he was commissioned colonel in command on the frontiers, and performed distinguished services. Smith moved to Kentucky in 1788. He was a member of the Danville convention, and represented Bourbon county for many years in the legislature. He died in Washington county, Kentucky, in 1812. The following narrative of his experience as member of an Indian tribe is from his own book entitled “Remarkable Adventures in the Life and Travels of Colonel James Smith,” printed at Lexington, Kentucky, in 1799. It affords a striking contrast to the terrible experiences of the other captives whose stories are republished in this book; for he was well treated, and stayed so long with his red captors that he acquired expert knowledge of their arts and customs, and deep insight into their character.

Biography of James W. Miller

Was born near Staunton, Augusta county, Virginia, May 14, 1823, where he lived with his parents, George M. and Margaret A. Miller, until his fourteenth year. He received a common school education, having attended the early subscription schools of his native county. Leaving home in 1836, he went to Lexington, Rockbridge county, Virginia, where he was employed as a clerk in the store of Moore & McCue, remaining with them until 1840, when he was employed in the same capacity by Samuel B. Finley, of the same place. From Lexington he went to Charlottesville, Virginia, in 1842, and accepted a

Biographical Sketch of Edwin Beard

Edwin Beard and his wife, Mary Bell, of Ireland, came to America and settled in Augusta Co., Va. They had William, John, David, Charles, and Samuel. The latter was a soldier in the revolutionary war, and was present at the surrender of Lord Cornwallis at Yorktown. He married Sarah Craig, of Staunton, Va., and settled first in Pennsylvania, from whence he removed to Kentucky in 1792, and to Missouri in 1827. His children were John, William, David, Samuel, Absalom, James, Mary B., Sarah L., and Elizabeth. William was a soldier in the war of 1812, under Gen. Harrison. He married

Letter from John Crosby, Deputy Clerk, to Franklin D. Love

Staunton, Virginia, May 13th, 1903. Mr. F.D. Love, Georgetown, Texas. Dear Sir: I am in receipt of your letter of the 14th, of April, last, addressed to the Clerk, which has been handed to me by him for reply. Our records run back to 1745, the records show the names of Robert, Samuel, Ephriam and Joseph Love, who came to this county from Pennsylvania about 1747, but as these old records are poorly indexed and some of them not indexed at all, it is quite a laborious task to look up matters of this character, and I could not undertake

Col. Robert Love – Revolutionary War Record

Revolutionary War Record of Col. Robert Love. (Some Data) Lieutenant Robert Love, in the year 1776 was stationed at Ft. Robertson, which was located at the head of the Clinch and Sandy rivers in what was then Montgomery County, Virginia, and served as Sergeant in Captain John Stephens company against the Shawnee Indians from April to October. 1780 he served about six months against the Tories as Lieutenant under Col. William Campbell. This service was rendered on Tom’s Creek at the Moravian Old Town in North Carolina, and on an excursion up to and near the Shallow Ford of the

Joseph Bell

In the name of God. Amen! I, Joseph Bell, of the County of Augusta, and state of Virginia, being of sound and disposing mind and memory do make my last Will and Testament in manner following, towit: I give my soul to Almighty God who gave it, and my body to the Earth, all my just debts and funeral expenses to be paid first, etc. Impremises, I give, demise and bequeath to my Brother, William Bell’s two oldest children, James Bell and Elizabeth Bell, two hundred acres of land on both sides of the South River adjoining the line that

Captain William Nalle’s Company

A List Of Captain William Nalle’s Company Of Volunteers in The Augusta County Regiment William Nalle, Captain Martin Nalle, Lieutenant Jacob Pence, Ensign John Bush, Sergeant William Bush, Sergeant Bernard Crawford, Sergeant Privates Shadrick Butler William Feavill Robert Mains Moses Smith Stephen Washburn Israel Meaders Henry Owler John Griggsby Richard Welch Zacarias Lee John Goodall Benjamin Petty Michael Jordan Bruten Smith James Todd William Spicer James Washburn Charles Brown James Alexander George Rucker Joseph Ray (or Roay) William Scales John Bright Yenty Jackson John Owler George Fuls (or Fultz) James Miller George Harmon John Chisholm Adam Hansbarger Henry Cook John

Biography of William Horner Cocke

With various corporate interests William Horner Cocke has been closely associated, these various business enterprises benefiting by the stimulus of his industry, keen sagacity and capable management. He has made for himself a most creditable position in business circles and since 1908 has been president and general manager of the Commercial Acid Company which in 1918 became the Southern Acid & Sulphur Company of St. Louis, while with various other concerns he is also associated as stockholder or official. He was born in City Point, Virginia, September 12, 1874. His father, Henry Teller Cocke, was born in Prince George county,

Biography of William A. Baker

The commercial interests of Moscow are well represented by William Alexander Baker, a leading and enterprising merchant, whose well directed efforts, sound judgment and reliable dealing are bringing to him a creditable and satisfactory success. For twelve years he has carried on operations in Moscow, where he deals in both new and second-hand goods. He is a native of Virginia, born in Augusta County, July 13, 1855, of Scotch-Irish descent. His grandfather, Guinn Baker, was the founder of the family in the Old Dominion, and was an industrious and respected farmer and a valued member of the Methodist church. He

Biographical Sketch of John McKinney

John McKinney, of Staunton, Virginia, served in the American army during the latter part of the revolution, and had his thigh broken by a musket ball, which lamed him for life. He settled at Lexington, Kentucky, where he taught school, and was elected Sheriff of the County. He married a Mexican woman, by whom he raised a large family. In 1805 he came to Missouri on a trading and prospecting tour, and in 1809 he moved his family here. When the Indian war began, he took his family back to Kentucky, to get them out of danger. His son Alexander