Location: Alstead New Hampshire

Biography of Albert S. Wait

Albert S. Wait, of Newport, the oldest lawyer in active practice in Sullivan County, was born in Chester, Windsor County, Vt., April 14, 1821, son of Daniel and Cynthia (Reed) Wait. His grandfather, John Wait, was among the early settlers of Mason, N.H. John moved to Weston, Vt., and was a sturdy farmer of that Green Mountain town and a highly respected member of the community. He died in Weston at a good old age. His children were: James, John Sumner, Daniel Amos, Lucinda, and Mrs. Davis. Daniel Wait, who followed the trade of blacksmith, was a Brigadier-general in the

Amos Wood Genealogy

1. Amos2 Wood, son of Joshua1 and Esther (Esty) Wood, was b. in Keene, June 16, 1794; d. Wilton, June 12, 1873; was a farmer and lived in Keene, Walpole and Wilton. He was a Deacon in the Congregational church of Walpole. He m. (1), Sept. 23, 1817, Fanny Seward, b. Sullivan, Nov. 13, 1794, d. Walpole, Sept. 19, 1848; dau. of Dea. Josiah and Sarah (Osgood) Seward of S. He m. (2), Mar 20, 1850. Pamelia Wightman, b. Walpole (?), 1795, d. there, Nov. 16, 1854; dau. of Israel and Frances (Allen) Wightman; m. (3), Apr. 16, 1858, Mrs.

Benjamin Willis Genealogy

Benjamin1 Willis, who d. at Keene, Mar. 22, 1820, aged 80, was probably the father of Benjamin2, 1, of Sullivan. 1. Benjamin2 Willis, son of Benjamin1, was a farmer and res. Keene and Sullivan; d. in Sullivan, Aug. 26, 1837, aged 75; m. Mar. 17, 1785, Annis Briggs b. Norton, Mass., Sept. 25, 1759, d. Sullivan, Jan. 22, 1831; dau. of Elisha and Mary Briggs of Keene. Ch. b. Keene: Mary3 (christened Polly), b. Mar. 17, 1785; m. John Newman (q. v.) Sarah3, b. 1789; m. Robert. Hall (q. v.) Annis3, b. May 25, 1794. Asenath3, b. unk.; d. Keene,

General History of Alstead New Hampshire

ALSTEAD, with an area of 24,756 acres, lies in the extreme northern part of the county, in 43° 6′ of north latitude, and longitude 4° 48′ east from Washington,* bounded north by Sullivan county, east by Marlow, south by Gilsum and Surry, and west by Walpole and a part of Sullivan county. The territory now lying within its limits was originally granted by Gov. Benning Wentworth, probably in 1761. He at that time granted charters for seventy-eight townships, lying on both sides of the Connecticut, principally for the purpose of establishing a claim to the territory in the then unsettled

Alstead Village, Cheshire County NH

ALSTEAD is a handsome post village located in the northwestern part of the town on Cold river. It his two churches (Congregational and Universalist), six or seven stores, several shops or mills of various kinds, and about 100 dwellings. Formerly there was a large amount of paper manufactured here, and from this circumstance the place was called Paper Mill Village, a name which clung to it until about twenty years ago, when the postoffice received the name of Alstead. A point of interest in the vicinity worthy of mention is the “Cocked Hat,” a name given in eminence just east

Biographical Sketch of Thomas R. Prentiss

Thomas R. Prentiss was born in Langdon, N. H., in 1803, and came to Alstead about 1834. He followed mercantile pursuits about ten years, and subsequently engaged in the manufacture of paper. In company with his son, Frederick L., he built a paper-mill upon the site of the one destroyed by fire in 1868, and which was in turn destroyed, in 1881. He died September 27, 1899. Two of his eight children are living, viz.: Lewis M., in Chicago, and Frederick L., in this town. The latter served as a drummer during the late war, and is the present town

Biographical Sketch of Thomas Dinsmore

Thomas Dinsmore came to Alstead at an early day and settled near the village, upon the farm now owned by John G. Turner. He carried on blacksmithing and farming, reared a large family, and died about 1842. His son, Calvin, born on the old homestead, died here in 1868. He was also a blacksmith and a farmer. Of his large family of twelve children, eight attained a mature age, and five of the six surviving ones reside in the town. John G. is president of the Connecticut River National bank of Charlestown ; Edward resides on Pleasant street, and Thomas

Biographical Sketch of Emerson Smith

Emerson Smith came to Alstead, from Hollis, N. H., about 1800, being formerly a resident of Maine, and a carpenter by trade. His son, Ralph E., was born at Hollis in 1791. He learned the clothier’s trade and carried on the business here for a number of years. He married Bia, daughter of Esq Moses Hale, reared eight children, and died in 1854, aged sixty-three yea. Of his three sons, two are living, Moses H., in Nebraska, and George H., to Harrisonville, both of whom served in the late war. Two daughters of Ralph E. are living, Maria L. Woodward,

Biographical Sketch of Samuel Thurston

Samuel Thurston came to Alstead, from Marlboro, N. H., about 1800, locating near where his grandson, Lorenzo G. now resides. He was a schoolteacher and farmer, and died December 23, 1873, aged ninety-eight years, four months and eight days. Three of his five children are now living. Franklin R., in Concord, Joseph. in Keene, and Alden S., in this town. The latter has taught school fifty-five terms and has held the office of selectman, justice of the peace, superintendent of school committee, etc.

Biographical Sketch of Dea. Noah Vilas

Dea. Noah Vilas, the only child of Peter Vilas, the immigrant and the progenitor of the entire Vilas family in America, came to Alstead in 1779, from Grafton, Mass. He had a family of six sons and two daughters. The first son, Joseph, and one daughter died in infancy. Wm. F. Vilas, PostmasterGeneral in President Cleveland’s cabinet, is a descendant of Dea. Noah Vilas.