Location: Alfred Maine

Descendants of Thomas Boyden of Bridgewater, MA

BOYDEN (Walpole-Bridgewater family). For a half century – for fifty and more years: – the name Boyden has stood in the town of Bridgewater, Mass., as a synonym for the highest type of useful, ennobling and elevating citizenship, as exemplified in the life of the now venerable principal emeritus of the Bridgewater State Normal School, Prof. Albert Gardner Boyden, who for the long period of fifty and more years has been identified as student, teacher and principal with the noted institution of learning alluded to, and has reared a son who has taken up the work so recently laid down

Appleton Family Genealogy of Saco Valley Maine

The Appleton family were residents at Great and Little Waldingford, in Suffolk, England, from a remote period. A John Appleton died at the former place in 1436. Samuel Appleton, descended from this race, came to New England in 1635, and settled at Ipswich; was admitted freeman in May, 1636, and was representative at the May and September sessions of the General Court, in 1637. He was born at Little Waldingford in 1586; died in Ipswich in June, 1670, leaving John, Samuel, Judith, and Martha. John Appleton, b. at Little Waldingford, in 1622, was representative for Ipswich for nineteen years. He

Biographical Sketch of Allen, Stillman Boyd

Allen, Stillman Boyd, son of Horace O. and Elizabeth Allen, was born September 8, 1830, at Waterborough, New county, Maine. He received his education in the academies at North Yarmouth, Kennebunk and Alfred, Maine. In September 1853, he was admitted to the bar, and practiced law in Maine until May, 1861, when he removed to Boston, and two years later became associated with the Hon. John D. Long, who subsequently retired from the firm upon his election as governor of the State. He is now the senior member of the law fir of Allen, Long & Hemenway (Governor Long since

Biography of Alfred A. Plummer, Sr.

ALFRED A. PLUMMER, Sr. – This pioneer of the port of entry was born at Alfred, Maine, March 3, 1822. He was the son of John and Eliza Adams Plummer, of an old family of the Pine Tree state. In early life young Plummer removed to Boston and learned the saddlery and harness trade, thereby acquiring practical ideas, and the facile use of his hands, which fitted him for the varied work of the pioneer on our coat. In 1849 he left for the Pacific shores, coming with the argonauts who steered their way across the seas of grass, and