Hopkins Co., Ky

HOPKINS CO. (M. Hanberry) [TR: also spelled Hanbery.]

In this county practically no one owned more than one or two slaves as this was never a county of large plantations and large homes. These slaves were well housed, in cabins, well clothed and well fed, not overworked and seldom sold, were in closer touch with the “white folks” and therefore more intelligent than farther south where slaves lived in quarters and seldom came in contact with their masters or the masters’ families. When a gentleman wished a slave he usually went to Hopkinsville and bought slaves there. Occasionally one slave owner would buy one from another. “If there was ever a slave market in Madisonville or Hopkins County I do not remember it or ever heard of it,” says J.M. Adams, book-keeper of Harlen Coal Company, age 84, Madisonville, Ky.


Surnames:
Adams,

Collection:
Federal Writers' Project. WPA Slave Narratives. Web. 2007-2024. The WPA Slave Narratives must be used with care. There is, of course, the problem of confusion in memory resulting from (73+ years) of the participants. In addition, inexperienced interviewers sometimes pursued question lines related to their own interests and perspectives and attempted to capture the colloquialism of the informant's speech. The interviews provide fascinating insight and surprisingly candid information, however.

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