Collection: Tribal Genealogy Research

Comanche Indian Research

Comanche. One of the southern tribes of the Shoshonean stock, and the only one of that group living entirely on the plains. Their language and traditions show that they are a comparatively recent offshoot from the Shoshoni of Wyoming, both tribes speaking practically the same dialect and, until very recently, keeping up constant and friendly communication. Archives, Libraries  and Societies Societies Oklahoma Historical Society American Indian Land Records, Research Guide (PDF) Removal, 1830-1862 Comanche Oklahoma Genealogical Society United States Court – Indian Territory Comanche Indian Biographies Native American Biographies Quana Parker The Story of Quanah Parker (hosted at Murray County

Choctaw Indian Research

Choctaw (possibly a corruption of the Spanish chcdu, ‘flat’ or ‘flattened,’ alluding to the custom of these Indians of flattening the head). An important tribe of the Muskhogean stock, formerly occupying middle and south Mississippi, their territory extending, in their most flourishing days, for some distance east of Tombigbee River, probably as far as Dallas County, Ga. Ethnically they belong to the Choctaw branch of the Muskhogean family, which included the Choctaw, Chickasaw, Hunt and their allies, and some small tribes which formerly lived along Yazoo River. Archives, Libraries and Genealogy Societies Societies Oklahoma Historical Society Indian Archives Holdings Summary

Chippewa Indians Research

Chippewa (popular adaptation of Ojibway, ‘to roast till puckered up,’ referring, to the puckered seam on their moccasins; from ojib ‘to pucker up,’ ub-way ‘to roast’). One of the largest tribes North of Mexico, whose range was formerly along both shores of Lake Huron and Superior, extending across Minnesota Turtle Mountains, North Dakota. Read More.. Chippewa Indian Biographies William Edward Davis III (1873-1940) (hosted at USGenWeb Project) Harry J. Haynes Bureau of Indian Affairs Tracing your Indian Ancestors Tribal Leaders Directory Recognized Indian Entities, 10/2010 Update (PDF) Chippewa Indian Cemeteries Following (hosted at USGenWeb Project) Tombstones at the Catholic Cemetery,

Chinook Indian Research

Chinook Indians (from Tsinúk, their Chehalis name). The best-known tribe of the Chinookan family. They claimed the territory on the north side of Columbia River, Wash., from the mouth to Grays bay, a distance of about 15 miles, and north along the seacoast as far as the north part of Shoalwater bay, where they were met by the Chehalis, a Salish tribe. The Chinook were first described by Lewis and Clark, who visited them in 1805, though they had been known to traders for at least 12 years previously. Read more about Chinook History Chinook Indian Biographies Native American Biographies

Chickasaw Indian Research

Chickasaw Indians. An important Muskhogean tribe, closely related to the Choctaw in language and customs, although the two tribes were mutually hostile. Aside from tradition, the earliest habitat traceable for the Chickasaw is north Mississippi. Their villages in the 18th century centered about Pontotoc and Union counties, where the headwaters of the Tombigbee meet those of Yazoo river and its affluent, the Tallahatchie, about where the De Soto narratives place them in 1540, under the name Chicaza. Read more about Chickasaw Tribe History. Archives, Libraries  and Genealogy Societies AccessGenealogy Library – Provides a listing of our on line books, books

Map of Caddoan Mississippi Culture

Caddo Indian Research

These resources should assist your in your Caddo Indian research. Most of the links feature content found on AccessGenealogy and it’s sister sites, however some of these are offsite resources of which AccessGenealogy has no relationship other then we value the content we link to for the quality of it’s information. If you know of a quality website which we haven’t featured on the Caddo tribe then please feel free to submit them through the comments at the bottom of the page.

Blackfeet Indian Research

Siksika (‘black feet’, from siksinam ‘black’, ka the root of oqkatsh, ‘foot’. The origin of the name is disputed, but it is commonly believed to have reference to the discoloring of their moccasins by the ashes of the prairie fires; it may possibly have reference to black-painted moccasins such as were worn by the Pawnee, Sihasapa, and other tribes). An important Algonquian confederacy of the northern plains, consisting of three subtribes, the Siksika proper or Blackfeet, the Kainah or Bloods, and the Piegan, the whole body being popularly known as Blackfeet. In close alliance with these are the Atsina and

Assiniboin Indian Research

Assiniboin Indians (Chippewa: ŭ’sini, stone’ ŭ’pwäwa ‘he cooks by roasting’: ‘one who cooks by the use of stones.’-W. J.). A large Siouan tribe, originally constituting a part of the Yanktonai. Their separation from the parent stem, to judge by the slight dialectal difference in the language, could not have greatly preceded the appearance of the whites, but it must have taken place before 1640, as the Jesuit Relation for that year mentions the Assiniboin as distinct. The Relation of 1658 places them in the vicinity of Lake Alimibeg, between Lake Superior and Hudson bay. On Jefferys’ map of 1762 this

Cheyenne – Arapaho Indian Research

An important Plains tribe of the great Algonquian family, closely associated with the Cheyenne for at least a century past. They call themselves Iñunaina, about equivalent to ‘our people.’ The name by which they are commonly known is of uncertain derivation, but it may possibly be, as Dunbar suggests, from the Pawnee tirapihu or larapihu, ‘trader.’ By the Sioux and Cheyenne they are called ” Blue-sky men ” or “Cloud men,” the reason for which is unknown. Read more about Arapaho Tribe History. Cheyenne – Arapaho Indian Biographies Little Raven (Hósa, ‘Young Crow’). An Arapaho chief. Nawat (‘Left-hand’). The principal

Apache Indian Research

Apache Indians (probably from ápachu, ‘enemy,’ the Zuñi name for the Navaho, who were designated “Apaches de Nabaju” by the early Spaniards in New Mexico). A number of tribes forming the most southerly group of the Athapascan family. The name has been applied also to some unrelated Yuman tribes, as the Apache Mohave (Yavapai) and Apache Yuma. The Apache call themselves N’de, Dĭnë, Tĭnde, or Inde, `people.’ Read more about the Apache Tribe History. Archives, Libraries, and Societies Museum of New Mexico Apache Cultural Center & Museum (hosted at White Mountain Apache Tribe Apache Indian Biography Indian Chiefs and Leaders