Collection: Monuments To Six Nation Indians

Seneca Indian Village Site of Kanadesaga

From Canoga the warriors headed north to the Great Trail and then west to the City of Geneva. At Geneva, Mr. Robert Breed, a member of the Geneva Historical society and a friend of the Indian People, personally took the warriors to several ancient Seneca village sites and memorials among which were the following: At the White Springs Farm they visited the site of the main village of the Senecas known as Ganechtage. Here they saw the ancient Indian Springs known as The White Springs. This water supply was the reason for the location of this old village. As the

1749 Lewis Evans Map

Iroquois Trails in Pennsylvania

Leaving To-ri-wa-wa-kon and the grave of Shikellamy, the Mohawks traveled up the great river Susquehanna until they arrived at Lewisburg. Here they visited an ancient Indian village site which was an earlier residence of the noted Oneida chief Shikellamy. Continuing still north up the river the warriors arrived at still another of Shikellamy’s towns. Here the great chief also resided, just south of the Village of Milton, Pennsylvania. From this village site the Mohawks traveled over a road that was once called, The Sheshequin Path. This ancient Iroquois trail was used by Conrad Weiser and Shikellamy on trips through this

Joseph Brant

Thayendanegea, Captain Joseph Brant

Thayendanegea ‘Two Sticks of Wood Bound Together-denoting strength’ was a Mohawk Pine Tree Chief. He was born in 1742 on the banks of the Ohio River while his parents were on a hunting trip in that section. His home was at Canajoharie Castle in the Mohawk Valley of New York State. Thayendanegea was 13 years old when he went on his first war path. He joined the Mohawk warriors under Aroniateka or Chief Hendrick at the Battle of Lake George in 1755. He later attended Dr. Wheelock’s School at Lebanon, Conn., where he learned to read and write. Read a

Treaty Rock, Canandaigua, New York

In central New York State at the end of beautiful Canandaigua Lake there is the village of Canandaigua. Here there is a stone marker pointing out the place where the famous Pickering or Canandaigua Treaty took place. This historic event, occurring here on Nov. 11, 1794, was the treaty which established peace and friendship between the Six Nation Iroquois Confederacy and the United States. Over 1,600 Indians were present when this treaty was signed. The State of New York as an English and Dutch colony, had made treaties with the Six Nations. She planned to continue this practice as a

High Rock Spring

The Spring Of The Great Spirit, Saratoga, New York

In the Village of Saratoga, N. Y., is a spring that has always been regarded by the ancient Mohawks as being very sacred because of its healing powers. It was called by them, “The Spring of the Great Spirit.” Near it is an inscription which reads, “This sacred spring of the Mohawks was known as the Spring of the Great Spirit and it is now known as The High Rock Spring. The first white man to visit it was Sir William Johnson in 1767. General George Washington, George Clinton and Alexander Hamilton visited Philip Schuyler at this spring in 1788.”

Grave of Oneida Chief Skenandoah

Skenandoah’s Grave, Hamilton College, Clinton, New York

Heading southwest out of Utica, and still following the Central Trail of the Six Nations, the Akwesasne Warriors headed for Hamilton College near the little village, of Clinton It was here that the great Oneida Chief, Skenandoah, is buried, and the region that they were now in was the territory of the ancient Oneida nation, the land deeded to by the Great Spirit. In the Hamilton College Cemetery the warriors saw a large head-stone where the remains of Skenandoah were transferred in 1856 so that he might lie next to his white brother, Samuel Kirkland, the founder of the College.

Seneca Council House, Letchworth Park, New York

Inscription: This ancient Seneca Council House stood at Ga-o-ya-de-a ‘Where the Heavens Rest Upon the Earth’ on the Genesee River in days antedating the American Revolution. In it gathered the war parties ‘that fought in the defense of their country.’ Before it prisoners ran the gauntlet. Around its council fires sat famous warriors and chiefs. It was rededicated Oct. 1, 1872 by the last Indian Council of the Genesee.” At this council Ga-yeh-twa-geh ‘Nicholson Parker’ gave the opening address which was as follows: “Brothers: I will say a few words. We have come here as representatives of the Seneca Nation

Sir William Johnson Grave

Sir William Johnson, Johnstown, New York

Sir William Johnson was the first official representative of the British Crown to the Iroquois Confederacy. This man, strong in body and friendly in manner, attended and showed an interest in the Mohawk Councils. He also took an active part in the Indian sports and games and learned the Mohawk language. Johnson’s fair dealing with the Six Nations became recognized by the Confederacy. His appointment as Superintendent of Six Nation Affairs, won the approval of the Chiefs, Warriors and Women of the Six Nations. Colonel Johnson was given the highest honour the Six Nations could give a leader or chief.

Red Jacket, Sagoyewatha, or Keeper Awake

Red Jacket Monument, Forest Lawn Cemetery, Buffalo, New York

Much has been said of the speaking ability of this noted Indian. A good example of one of his famous speeches was one that was delivered to a missionary named Cram who visited the Senecas, in 1805. This missionary requested a council with the Senecas, claiming that he had an important message to deliver to them. When the people had assembled, Cram gave a speech in which he told the Indians that they had never worshipped God in a decent manner but that they and their fathers had been in great darkness and error. He informed them that he had

Red Jacket Monuments

From the ancient site of Cayuga Castle the Mohawks turned north to the head of the lake. Following the road that once was an Indian trail down the west side of Cayuga Lake, they arrived at Canoga, the site of an ancient Indian village which Indian tradition says was the birthplace of the famous orator Red Jacket. Here on Canoga Creek once stood the village of Skannayutenate, birthplace of Sa-go-ye-wat-ha, the famous Seneca leader. On this ancient village site the warriors saw a monument erected to Red Jacket. The monument contained a picture of a wolf, the clan of Red Jacket