Eastern Cherokee Nation

Donaldson, Thomas. Indians, Eastern Band of Cherokees of North Carolina 11th Census of the United States, Robert P. Porter, Superintendent, US Printing Office, Washington, D.C. 1892.

Eastern Cherokee Enumeration, 1890

The enumeration for the census of 1890 of the Eastern Band of Cherokees of North Carolina was made by the regular enumerators for the state of North Carolina. The United States Indian agent, James Blythe, a Cherokee (Dis-qua-ni, Chestnut Bread), furnishes the following data collected during personal visitations: The total number of Cherokees is 1,520: …

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Eastern Band of Cherokee Historical Outline

The Eastern Band of Cherokees have been thus officially recognized to distinguish them from that portion of the nation which emigrated west, between 1809 and 1817, and located on the public domain at the headwaters of Arkansas and White rivers, now in Cherokee nation, Indian territory. The latter became known as the Cherokee nation west, …

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Eastern Band of Cherokee, Religion and Morals

The superstitions and religious extravaganzas of ancient times have almost disappeared. Lingering fancies as to witches and witchcraft crop out from time to time among these Indians, but in no more unreasonable forms than among their neighbors. The church organizations are in a languishing condition. While the people as a whole are Christian in theory …

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Eastern Band of Cherokees of North Carolina

No section of country in the United States combines a greater variety of inland scenery than that occupied by the Eastern Band of Cherokee Indians, embracing portions of the counties of Cherokee, Graham, Jackson, and Swain, in southwestern North Carolina. Nestled between the Blue Ridge on the east and the Smoky mountains on the west, …

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