Alabama Census Records

Starting in 1790, the United States government took a census every 10 years. Alabama residents are included in the censuses for 1820 through 1920.

Records exist for only 8 of the 30 enumerated counties in the 1820 Federal Census. These counties include Baldwin, Conecuh, Dallas, Franklin, Limestone, St. Clair, Shelby, and Wilcox.

The only extant records for Alabama in the 1890 census are parts of Perryville (Beat No. 11) and Severe (Beat No. 8 ) of Perry County.

Alabama Mortality Census Records

The 1850, 1860, 1870, 1880, and 1885 censuses included inquiries about persons who had died in the twelve months immediately preceding the enumeration. The 1850, 1860, 1870, and 1880 Alabama mortality census all survived. Mortality schedules list deaths from 1 June through 31 May of 1849–50, 1859–60, 1869–70, 1879–80, and 1884–85. They provide nationwide, state-by-state death registers that predate the recording of vital statistics in most states. While deaths are under-reported, the mortality schedules remain an invaluable source of information.

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Alabama Census Information

Sizeable state census exist for Alabama for the following years:

1855–index (14 counties: Autauga, Baldwin, Blount, Coffee, Franklin, Henry, Lowndes, Macon, Mobile, Montgomery [on film, but not included in the index], Pickens, Sumter [not on microfilm and not included in the index], Tallapoosa, Tuscaloosa): name of head of household; number of free white males and females in age categories; number of slaves and free persons of color in age categories.

1866–no index: name of head of household for African-Americans and whites; number of females and males in age categories.

These state census if not available yet online and linked from our site are available at the Alabama Department of Archives and History.

For additional Alabama census facts, see the following:


Collection:
Census Records: A directory of resources providing online access to census records. Copyright 1999-2020, AccessGenealogy.

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