Topic: Wasco

Indian Treaties Waco to Yakima

Treaties for all tribes listed below. Names in (parentheses) are other names used for tribe Waco, Walla Walla, Wasco, Wea, Winnebago, Witchetaw, Wyandot and Yakima Tribes Waco Treaties (Wacoe) Treaty of May 15, 1846 Walla-Walla Treaties Treaty of June 25, 1855 Treaty of June 9, 1855 Treaty of November 15, 1865 Wasco Treaties Treaty of June 25, 1855 Treaty of November 15, 1865 Wea Treaties Treaty of August 3, 1795 Treaty of June 7, 1803 Treaty of August 21, 1805 Treaty of September 30, 1809 Treaty of October 26, 1809 Treaty of June 4, 1816 Treaty of October 2, 1818

Treaty of November 15, 1865

Articles of agreement and convention entered into at the Warm Springs Agency, Oregon, by J. W. Perit Huntington, sup’t Indian affairs for Oregon, on behalf of the United States, and the undersigned, chiefs and head-men of the confederated tribes and bands of Middle Oregon, the same being amendatory of and supplemental to the treaty negotiated with the aforesaid tribes on the twenty-fifth day of June, eighteen hundred and fifty-five, and ratified by the Senate of the United States on the eighteenth day of April, eighteen hundred and fifty-nine. Article 1. It having become evident from experience that the provision of

Treaty of June 25, 1855

Articles of agreement and convention made and concluded at Wasco, near the Dalles of the Columbia River, in Oregon Territory, by Joel Palmer, superintendent of Indian affairs, on the part of the United States, and the following-named chiefs and head-men of the confederated tribes and bands of Indians, residing in Middle Oregon, they being duly authorized thereto by their respective bands, to wit: Symtustus, Locks-quis-sa, Shick-a-me, and Kuck-up, chiefs of the Taih or Upper De Chutes band of Walla – Wallas; Stocket-ly and Iso, chiefs of the Wyam or Lower De Chutes band of Walla – Wallas; Alexis and Talkish,

Wasco Indian Tribe Photo Descriptions

The Wasco, like the Warm Springs Indians, are related to the Walla Walla, and through them to the Sahaptin family. The name signifies “basin,” and the tribe derives its name, traditionally, from the fact that formerly one of their chiefs, his wife having died, spent much of his time in making cavities or basins in the soft rock for his children to fill with water and pebbles, and thereby amuse themselves.” They came originally from around the Dalles. Are associated with the Warm Springs and Tenino on a reservation in Oregon just south of the Columbia. Now number 263, profess

Wasco Tribe

Wasco Indians. A Chinookan tribe formerly living on the south side of Columbia river, in the neighborhood of The Dalles, in Wasco County, Oregon. This tribe, with the Wishram (also known as Tlakluit and Echeloot), on the north side of the river, were the easternmost branches of the Chinookan family.

Warm Springs Reservation

The Warm Springs Indians came from near The Dalles, Oregon, in 1858-1859; the Wascos, from The Dalles, or near it, in 1858-1859; the Teninos, from near The Dalles in 1858-1859; the John Days, about 30 years ago, from or near John Days River, 40 miles east; of The Dalles. The Piutes (Pah Utes) were formerly located on the Malheur reservation, Oregon, but after the Bannock War of 1878-1879 they were taken to Port Vancouver or the Simcoe agency, Yakama reservation, most part to the latter place; those front Vancouver came here in the fall of 1879; those front Yakama came