Topic: Timucuan

Yustaga Indians

Yustaga Tribe. Meaning unknown. Yustaga Connections. No words of the Yustaga language have been preserved but circumstantial evidence indicates they belonged to the Timucuan branch of the Muskhogean linguistic stock, although occasionally the provinces of Timucua and Yustaga are spoken of as if distinct. Yustaga Location. Approximately between Aucilla and Suwannee Rivers, somewhat toward the coast. Yustaga Villages. The Yustaga villages cannot be satisfactorily identified though the missions of Asile, San Marcos, Machaba, and San Pedro seem to have belonged to it. Yustaga History. The Yustaga are first mentioned by Biedma (in Bourne, 1904), one of the chroniclers of De

Pohoy Indians

Pohoy Indians, Pooy, or Posoy. Meaning unknown. Pohoy Connections. They were evidently closely connected with the Timucuan division of the Muskhogean linguistic stock. (See Utina). Pohoy Location. On the south shore of Tampa Bay. Pohoy Towns. (See History.) Pohoy History. This tribe, or a part of the same, appears first in history under the names Oçita or Ucita as a “province” in the territory of which Hernando de Soto landed in 1539. He established his headquarters in the town of the head chief on June 1, and when he marched inland on July 15 he left a captain named Calder6n

Icafui Indians

Icafui Tribe. Meaning unknown. Icafui Connections. They were undoubtedly of the Timucuan group though they seem to have been confused at times with a tribe called Cascangue which may have been related to the Muskogee or Hitchiti. On the other hand, Cascangue may have been another name of this tribe, possibly one employed by Creeks or Hitchiti. Icafui Location. On the mainland and probably in southeastern Georgia near the border between the Timucua and the strictly Muskhogean populations. Icafui Villages. Seven or eight towns are said to have belonged to this tribe but the names of none of them are

Fresh Water Indians

Fresh Water Tribe (“Agna Dulce”) Indians. A name applied to the people of seven to nine neighboring towns, and for which there is no native equivalent. Fresh Water Connections. The same as Acuera (q. v.). Fresh Water Location. In the coast district of eastern Florida between St. Augustine and Cape Canaveral. Fresh Water Villages The following towns are given in this province extending from north to south, but not all of the native names have been preserved: Anacape, said to have been 20 leagues south of St. Augustine. Antonico, another possible name is Tunsa. Equale, location uncertain. Filache, location uncertain.

Mocogo Indians

Mocogo Indians, or Mucogo Indians. Meaning unknown. Connections. They belonged with little doubt to the Timucuan division of the Muskhogean linguistic stock. Location. About the head of Hillsboro Bay. Villages.  None are mentioned under any other than the tribal name. History. The chief of this tribe gave asylum to a Spaniard named Juan Ortiz who had come to Florida in connection with the expedition of Narvaez. When De Soto landed near the Mocogo town its chief sent Ortiz with an escort of warriors to meet him. Ortiz afterward became De Soto’s principal interpreter until his death west of the Mississippi,

Acuera Indians

Acuera Tribe – Meaning unknown (acu signifies “and” and also “moon”). Acuera Connections. This tribe belonged to the Timucuan or Timuquanan linguistic division of the Muskhogean linguistic family. Acuera Location. Apparently about the headwaters of the Ocklawaha River. Acuera Towns. (See Utina.) Acuera History. The Acuera were first noted by De Soto in a letter written at Tampa Bay to the civil cabildo of Santiago de Cuba. According to information transmitted to him by his officer Baltazar de Gallegos, Acuera was “a large town where with much convenience we might winter,” but the Spaniards did not in fact pass through

Saturiba Tribe

Saturiba Indians. A Timucuan tribe in Florida, occupying, about 1565, the territory on both sides of lower St John river, with the adjacent coast territory, northward to Satilla river, Ga., including Cumberland (Tacatacuru) island, beyond which was Guale (Yamasee) territory

Timucuan Indians

Timucuan Family, Timucuan People, Timucuan Nation. A group of cognate tribes formerly occupying the greater part of North Florida, extending along the east coast from about lat. 28°, below Cape Canaveral, to above the mouth of St John river, and along the west coast probably from Tampa bay northward to about Ocilla river, where they met the Apalachee, of Muskhogean stock. The Hitchiti and Yamasee, also Muskhogean, appear to have occupied their north frontier nearly on the present state boundary but the Timucua held both banks of St Marys river and Cumberland island south of lat. 28° the west coast