Topic: Tenino

Captain Jack

War With The Modoc – Indian Wars

Early April 16th, the Modoc had a big fire in their camp. Major Thomas dropped a shell directly into it, provoking a frantic war whoop, and causing the sudden extinguishing of the fire. Another shell was dropped in the same locality, and was followed by yells of pain and dismay. The Modoc then appeared and challenged the soldiers to come out and fight. Another shell was the answer, and they were driven back. At 4 o’clock A. M. , after another fight, the Modoc gave up the attempt to break through the line and retired. Scattering shots were fired on the men

Treaty of November 15, 1865

Articles of agreement and convention entered into at the Warm Springs Agency, Oregon, by J. W. Perit Huntington, sup’t Indian affairs for Oregon, on behalf of the United States, and the undersigned, chiefs and head-men of the confederated tribes and bands of Middle Oregon, the same being amendatory of and supplemental to the treaty negotiated with the aforesaid tribes on the twenty-fifth day of June, eighteen hundred and fifty-five, and ratified by the Senate of the United States on the eighteenth day of April, eighteen hundred and fifty-nine. Article 1. It having become evident from experience that the provision of

Treaty of June 25, 1855

Articles of agreement and convention made and concluded at Wasco, near the Dalles of the Columbia River, in Oregon Territory, by Joel Palmer, superintendent of Indian affairs, on the part of the United States, and the following-named chiefs and head-men of the confederated tribes and bands of Indians, residing in Middle Oregon, they being duly authorized thereto by their respective bands, to wit: Symtustus, Locks-quis-sa, Shick-a-me, and Kuck-up, chiefs of the Taih or Upper De Chutes band of Walla – Wallas; Stocket-ly and Iso, chiefs of the Wyam or Lower De Chutes band of Walla – Wallas; Alexis and Talkish,

Tenino Tribe

Tenino Indians. A Shahaptian tribe formerly occupying the valley of Des Chutes River, Oregon.  The Tenino dialect was spoken on both sides of the Columbia from The Dalles to the mouth of the Umatilla.  In 1855 they joined in the Wasco treaty and were placed on Warm Springs Reservation, since which time they have usually been called Warm Springs Indians, a term embracing a number of tribes of other stocks which were included in the treaty.  The present number of Tenino is unknown, but it is probably not more than 30.

Warm Springs Reservation

The Warm Springs Indians came from near The Dalles, Oregon, in 1858-1859; the Wascos, from The Dalles, or near it, in 1858-1859; the Teninos, from near The Dalles in 1858-1859; the John Days, about 30 years ago, from or near John Days River, 40 miles east; of The Dalles. The Piutes (Pah Utes) were formerly located on the Malheur reservation, Oregon, but after the Bannock War of 1878-1879 they were taken to Port Vancouver or the Simcoe agency, Yakama reservation, most part to the latter place; those front Vancouver came here in the fall of 1879; those front Yakama came