Salish

Quinaielt Tribe

Quinaielt Indians. A Salish tribe on Quinaielt river, Washington and along the coast between the Quileute and the Quaitso on the north (the latter of which probably formed a part of the tribe), and the Chehalis on the south.  Lewis and Clark described them in two divisions, the Calasthocle and the Quiniilt, with 100 and …

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Puyallup Tribe

Puyallup Indians. An important Salish tribe on Puyallup River and Commencement Bay, west Washington. According to Gibbs, their designation is the Nisqualli name for the mouth of Puyallup River, but Evans 1Bancroft, Hist. Wash., 66, 1890 says the name means ‘shadow,’ from the dense shade of its forests. By treaty at Medicine Creek, Wash., Dec. …

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Salish Tribe

Salish Indians. (Okinagan: sälst, ‘people’). Formerly a large and powerful division of the Salishan family, to which they gave their name, inhabiting much of west Montana and centering around Flathead lake and valley. A more popular designation for this tribe is Flatheads, given to them by the surrounding people, not because they artificially deformed their …

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Suquamish Tribe

Suquamish Indians. A Salish division on the west side of Puget Sound, Washington.  According to Paige 1Paige, Ind. Aff. Rep, 329, 1857 they claimed the land from Appletree cove in the north to Gig Harbor in the south.  Seattle, who gave his name to the city, was chief of this tribe and the Dwamish in …

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Nooksak Tribe

Nooksak Indians (‘mountain men’).  The name given by the Indians on the coast to a Salish tribe, said to be divided into three small bands on a river of the same name in Whatcom County, Washington.  About 200 Nooksak were officially enumerated in 1906, but Hill-Tout says there are only about 6 true make Nooksak.  …

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Salishan Indian Dialects

The Salishan dialects may be grouped as follows: Dialects of the Interior Lillooet in west British Columbia Ntlakyapamuk (Thompson Indians) in south west British Columbia Shusowap in south central British Columbia Okinagan in south east British Columbia, extending into the United States, the subdivisions of which are Okinagan proper Colville Nespelim or Sanpoil Senijextee (Snaichekstik) …

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Spokane Tribe

Spokan Tribe, Spokan Indians, Spokane Indians. A name applied to several small bodies of Salish on and near Spokane River, north east Washington.  According to Gibbs the name was originally employed by the Skitswish to designate a band at the forks of the river, called also Smahoomenaish.  by the whites it was extended to cover …

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Ntlakyapamuk Tribe

Ntlakyapamuk Indians. One of the four great Salish tribes inhabiting the interior of British Columbia and popularly called Thompson Indian from the river on which a large part of them live. Internally they are divided into the Lower Thonlpsons living from a short distance below Spuzzum on Fraser river, nearly to the village of Cisco, …

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Shahaptian Indians

Shahaptian Family, Shahaptian Indians (from Saptini, pl. Sháptini, the Salish name for the Nez Percé). An important linguistic family occupying what is now south west Idaho, south east  Washington, and north east Oregon. The earlier, territory of the Shahaptian tribes extended from the Rocky mountains to the Cascade range, and from the Yakima river basin to …

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Duwamish Tribe

A small body of Salish near Seattle, Washington, which city was named from a chief of these and the Suquamish Indians.  Their proper seat, according to Gibbs, was at the outlet of Lake Washington.  In 1856 they were removed to the east shore of Bainbridge Island, but owing to the absence of a fishing ground …

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Salish Indians

Salish Indians. In western Montana originally, extending from the Rocky Mountains on the west; south to the Gallatin; east to Crazy Mountain and Little Belt Ranges, north to some hilly country north of Helena. Later they were centered farther west around Flathead Lake. The Salish belonged to the interior division of the Salishan linguistic family, to which they have given their name.

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