Topic: Iowa

Woodland complexes in northeastern Iowa

Woodland Complexes in Northeastern Iowa

This book, written by Wilfred D. Logan, an archeologist with many years of experience in the National Park Service, increases our understanding of the peoples whose burial mounds are preserved within the national monument and other sites in the surrounding locale. The volume presents data, not heretofore analyzed, from a large number of excavations in northeastern Iowa, and systematizes the material to develop a background against which to view the Effigy Mounds and the people who built them.

Treaty of September 16, 1815

A treaty of peace and friendship, made and concluded at Portage des Sioux, between William Clark, Ninian Edwards, and Auguste Chouteau, Commissioners Plenipotentiary of the United States of America, on the part and behalf of the said States, of the one part; and the undersigned, King, Chiefs, and Warriors, of the Iaway [Iowa] Tribe or Nation, on the part and behalf of the said Tribe or Nation, of the other part. The parties being desirous of re-establishing peace and friendship between the United States and the said tribe or nation, and of being placed in all things, and in every

Treaty of May 17, 1854

Articles of agreement and convention made and concluded at the city of Washington, this seventeenth day of May, one thousand eight hundred and fifty-four, by George W. Manypenny, commissioner on the part of the United States, and the following-named delegates of the Ioway tribe of Indians, viz: Non-chee-ning-a, or No Heart; Shoon- ty-ing-a, or Little Wolf; Wah-moon-a-ka, or the Man who Steals; and Nar-ge-ga-rash, or British; they being thereto duly authorized by said tribe. Article 1. The Ioway tribe of Indians hereby cede, relinguish, and convey to the United States, all their right, title, and interest in and to the

Treaty of October 19, 1838

Articles of a treaty made at the Great Nemowhaw sub-agency between John Dougherty Agent of Indian Affairs on the part of the United States, being specially authorized, and the chiefs and headmen of the Ioway tribe of Indians for themselves, and on the part of their tribe. Article 1. The Ioway tribe of Indians cede to the United States, First. All right or interest in the country between the Missouri and Mississippi rivers, and the boundary between the Sacs and Foxes, and Sioux, described in the second article of the treaty made with these and other tribes, on the 19th

Treaty of November 23, 1837

Articles of a treaty made at the city of Saint Louis, between Joshua Pilcher, thereto specially authorized by the President of the United States, and the Ioway [Iowa] Indians, by their chiefs and delegates. Article 1. The Ioway Indians cede to the United States all the right and interest in the land ceded by the treaty, concluded with them and other tribes on the 15th of July 1830, which they might be entitled to claim, by virtue of the phraseology employed in the second article of said treaty. Article 2. In consideration of the cession contained in the preceding article,

Treaty of September 17, 1836

Articles of a treaty, made and concluded at Fort Leavenworth, on the Missouri river, between William Clark, Superintendent of Indian Affairs, on the part of the United States, of the one part, and the undersigned chiefs, warriors, and counsellors of the Ioway [Iowa] tribe and the band of Sacks [Sac] and Foxes of the Missouri, (residing west of the State of Missouri,) in behalf of their respective tribes, of the other part. Article 1. By the first article of the treaty of Prairie du Chien, held the fifteenth day of July eighteen hundred and thirty, with the confederated tribes of

Potawatomi Reservation

Pottawatomie and Great Nemaha Agency Report, of Special Agent Reuben Sears on the Indians of the Pottawatomie, Kickapoo, Iowa, and Chippewa and Munsee reservations, Kansas, August and September 1890. Names of Indian tribes or parts of tribes occupying said reservations :(a) Prairie band of Pottawatomi, Kickapoo, [Iowa], Chippewa, and Munsee. The unallotted areas of these reservations are: Pottawatomi, 77,358 acres, or 120.75 square miles; treaties of June 5, 1846, 9 U. S. Stats, p. 853; of November 15, 1861 (12 U. S. Stats, p. 1191); treaty of relinquishment, February 27, 1867 (15 U. S. Stats, p. 531). Kickapoo, 20,273 acres,