Topic: Columbia

Analogy between the Nootkan and Columbian or Chinook

Dr. Scouler’s analogy between the Nootkan and “Columbian,” or Chinook, was founded on the following words: English Tlaoquatch and Nutka Columbian plenty *aya *haya no *wik *wake water tchaak chuck good *hooleish *closh bad *peishakeis *peshak man *tchuckoop tillicham woman *tlootsemin *clootchamen child *tanassis *tanass now tlahowieh clahowiah come *tchooqua *sacko slave mischemas *mischemas what are you doing *akoots-ka-*mamook ekta-*mammok what are you saying *au-kaak-*wawa ekta-*wawa let me see *nannanitch *nannanitch sun *opeth ootlach sky *sieya  *saya fruit  *chamas *camas to sell *makok *makok understand *commatax *commatax * But of these, none marked with an asterisk belong to the Chinook

Agreement of July 7, 1883

In the conference with chief Moses and Sar-sarp-kin, of the Columbia reservation, and Tonaskat and Lot, of the Colville reservation, had this day, the following was substantially what was asked for by the Indians: Tonasket asked for a saw and grist mill, a boarding school to be established at Bonaparte Creek to accommodate one hundred pupils (100), and a physician to reside with them, and $100. (one hundred) to himself each year. Sar-sarp-kin asked to be allowed to remain on the Columbia reservation with his people, where they now live, and to be protected in their rights as settlers, and

Moses, a great war chief who knew when not to fight

In the Northwest of our great country there are so many different tribes of Indians that I cannot begin to tell you their names, but they were often divided in this way: Those who lived on reservations were called “Reservation Indians” and those who did not, “Outside Indians.” Now, Moses was chief of a great many tribes of Outside Indians and he was a very great chief. Of course, Moses was not his Indian name, but Governor Stevens gave it to him long ago and every one called him so; indeed, he seemed to have forgotten his Indian name and

Columbia Indians

The Sinkiuse Indians / Columbia Indians lived on the east side of Columbia River from Fort Okanogan to the neighborhood of Point Eaton.