Topic: Chiaha

Chiaha Indians

Chiaha Tribe. Meaning unknown though it may contain a reference to mountains or highlands. (Cf. Choctaw and Alabama tcaha, Hitchiti tcäihi, “high.”) Also called: Tolameco or Solameco, which probably signifies “big town,” a name reported by the Spaniards. Chiaha Connections. The Chiaha belonged to the Muskhogean linguistic stock and in later times spoke the Muskogee’ ‘tongue, but there is every reason to class them in the Hitchiti group. (See Apalachicola) Chiaha Location. In later historic times the Chiaha were on the middle course of Chattahoochee River, but at the earliest period at which we have any knowledge of them they

Holmanns Map of 1759

Chiaha Tribe

The Chiaha were a more prominent tribe and evidently much larger than the Osochi. While the significance of their name is unknown it recalls the Choctaw chaha, “high,” “height,” and this would be in harmony with the situation in which part of the tribe was first encountered northward near the mountains of Tennessee. There is also a Cherokee place name which superficially resembles this, but should not be confounded with it. It is written by Mooney Tsiyahi and signifies “Otter place.” One settlement so named formerly existed on a branch of the Keowee River, near the present Cheohee, Oconee County,