Topic: Burial Records

Burials in Caves

The early settlers of eastern Tennessee, eastern Kentucky, and the adjoining region discovered many caves of varying sizes in the broken, mountainous country. In many instances human remains which had been deposited in the caverns, together with the garments and wrappings of tanned skins or woven fibers, were found in a remarkable state of preservation, having been thus preserved by the natural salts which abounded within the caves. Fortunately several very clear and graphic accounts of such discoveries were prepared. One most interesting example, then recently made in a cave in Barren County, Kentucky, was described in a letter written

Burial in Caves – Marshall County, Alabama

Resembling the preceding (Burials in Caves) was a cave in Marshall County, Alabama, about 1 mile west of Guntersville, a short distance from the bank of the Tennessee. “Its floor is covered to the depth of four feet with fragments of human bones, earth, ashes, and broken stones. This fragmentary condition of the deposits is chiefly due to the fact that they have been repeatedly turned over by treasure hunters. Much of this deposit has been hauled away in sacks for fertilizing the land. The number of dead deposited here must have been very great, for, notwithstanding so much has

Stone Lined Graves – Important Person

It must have been the tomb of an important person, the burial place of some great man, highly esteemed by his companions. The mound is, as shown in the plan, surrounded by a ditch and embankment. “The mound, which covers the entire area, save a narrow strip here and there, is 115 feet long and 96 feet wide at base, with a height of 23 feet. . . . The surrounding wall and ditch are interrupted only by the gateway at the east, which is about 30 feet wide. The ditch is 3 feet deep and varies in width from

Various Types of Iroquoian Burials

Many burials of special interest, either by reason of their rather unusual form or the material which they revealed, have been discovered in different parts of the present State of New York. These may be attributed to the people of the Five Nations, and seem to prove that all followed various methods of disposing of their dead. The quotations are made from Beauchamp, by whom the information was gathered from several sources. In Genesee County, the home of the Seneca, a cemetery encountered in a gravel bank some 6 miles southeast of Bergen ” has skeletons in a sitting posture,

Delaware Ceremony, 1762

“I was present in the year 1762, at the funeral of a woman of the highest rank and respectability, the wife of the valiant Delaware chief Shingask; . . . all the honours were paid to her at her interment that are usual on such occasions. . . . At the moment that she died, her death was announced through the village by women especially appointed for that purpose, who went through the streets crying, ‘She is no more! She is no more!’ The place on a sudden exhibited a scene of universal mourning; cries and lamentations were heard from

Old Ebenezer Church, Effingham County GA – 1775 Burials

Edward Haus, a man born in Pennsylvania, died Jan. 1, 1775, and was buried the same day. Nicholas Cronenberger died in the 59th year of his age Jan. 8, 1776, and was buried on the 9th in Ebenezer cemetery. Michael Rieser died Feb. 21, 1775, and was buried Feb. 22. Funeral text: Ps. 55:19. The Lord creates peace for my soul. Margaret Huber died in the night between March 31 and April 1, and was buried April 1. John Paul Miller died April II, .1775, and received Christian burial the next day. John George Maurer died April 16, 1775, and

Old Ebenezer Church, Effingham County GA – 1776 Burials

Timothy Lemke died in the best bloom of his age in his 24 year, Feb. 9, 1776, and was buried the next day. Funeral text: Is. 45 :15. Verily thou art a God that hidest thyself. Mrs. Catharine Lemke, widow of the former pastor, Rev. Herman Henry Lemke, entered into her rest by a blessed death Feb. 21, 1776, and was buried in the cemetery at Ebenezer after she had attained ,an age of 59 years and 3 months. Funeral text: Ps. 55:19. The Lord creates rest for my soul. Nathanial Biddenbach, 13 years old, died July 13, 1776, and

Old Ebenezer Church, Effingham County GA – 1777 Burials

The widow Reinier died Jan. 2, 1777, and received Christian burial the next day. John Klein, a husband of about 40 years, died March 29, 1777, and was buried the next day. The widow Glaner died after an illness of 8 days April 7, 1777, and received Christian burial the next day. Tobias Freyermuth, a child of 4 years, died April 30, and was buried the next day. Dana Pflueger, 11 years old, died Sept. 10, 1777, and received Christian burial the next day. Anna Margaret, daughter of Matthias Biddenbach, 13 years old, died Sept. 17, 1777, and received Christian

Old Ebenezer Church, Effingham County GA – 1778 Burials

Salome Haut died in her 32d year March 10, 1778, and was buried the next day. Ps. 25:17. Miss Catharine Bolzius died in the 36th year of her age March 9, 1778, and was buried on the same day. Funeral text: 2 Pet. 3:15. Christine Rieser died April 14, 1775 in the 8th year of her age, and received Christian burial on Palm Sunday. John George Bunz, a boy of 17 years, died June 7, 1778, on the same second day of Pentecost on which he, with other children, should have gone for the first time to communion. The funeral

Old Ebenezer Church, Effingham County GA – 1779 Burials

Hannah Elizabeth Bunz died in the 20th year of her age in childbed Feb. 3, 1779. Ps. 135:8. John Casper Werthsch died June 24, 1779, and received Christian burial the next day. Mrs. Anna Barbara Rabenhorst died July 1, 1779, and was buried the same day at Zion. Hannah, the 6 months old daughter of John Rudolph Binninger, died Aug. 19, 1779, and was buried the next day. Catharine Gravenstein died Aug. 27, 1779, and was buried the same day.