Tuttle

Tuttle, A. R. – Obituary

Elgin, Union County, Oregon Death of A. R. Tuttle Well Known Citizen and Editor of Elgin Recorder Passes Away The grim reaper, death, has again visited our community and has taken from our midst one of its most prominent citizens. A.R. Tuttle was well known throughout Union and adjacent counties, having been a resident of …

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Cynthia Todd Tuttle

TUTTLE, Cynthia Todd5, (Enos4, Gershom3, Michael2, Christopher1) born Feb. 12, 1771, died Jan. 10, 1852, married Joshua, son of Capt. Ithamar and Rhoda (Gaines) Tuttle, who was born March 3, 1764, died Feb. 20, 1850. Children: I. Harriet, b. March 21, 1790, d. Aug. 1, 1836. II. Ithamar, b. May 9, 1793, m. Nov. 22, …

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Lois Todd Turner

TURNER, Lois Todd4, (James3, Samuel2, Christopher1) born Nov. 10, 1729, died 1813, married Aug. 2, 1748, James, son of Joseph and Sarah (Hotchkiss) Turner, who was born May 13, 1727. Children: I. Lois, b. Oct. 12, 1749, m.(???)Ives. II. Bethuel, b. Dec. 27, 1751. III. Mary, b. April 7, 1754, m. Mar. 19, 1770, Hezekiah, …

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South Britain Connecticut Sketches and Records

This book contains much valuable genealogical data from local church records and cemeteries, and brief accounts of the following families : — Allen, Averill, Barnes, Bassett, Booth, Bradley, Bray, Canfield, Downs, Edmonds, French, Gilbert, Guthrie, Hann, Hayes, Hendryx, Hill, Mitchell, Pierce, Piatt, Post, Russell, Skeels, Stoddard, Tuttle, Wagner, Wakeley, Ward and Warner.

Weymouth ways and Weymouth people

Edward Hunt’s “Weymouth ways and Weymouth people: Reminiscences” takes the reader back in Weymouth Massachusetts past to the 1830s through the 1880s as he provides glimpses into the people of the community. These reminiscences were mostly printed in the Weymouth Gazette and provide a fair example of early New England village life as it occurred in the mid 1800s. Of specific interest to the genealogist will be the Hunt material scattered throughout, but most specifically 286-295, and of course, those lucky enough to have had somebody “remembered” by Edward.

Richard Dexter Genealogy, 1642-1904

Being a history of the descendants of Richard Dexter of Malden, Massachusetts, from the notes of John Haven Dexter and original researches. Richard Dexter, who was admitted an inhabitant of Boston (New England), Feb. 28, 1642, came from within ten miles of the town of Slane, Co. Meath, Ireland, and belonged to a branch of that family of Dexter who were descendants of Richard de Excester, the Lord Justice of Ireland. He, with his wife Bridget, and three or more children, fled to England from the great Irish Massacre of the Protestants which commenced Oct. 27, 1641. When Richard Dexter and family left England and by what vessel, we are unable to state, but he could not have remained there long, as we know he was living at Boston prior to Feb. 28, 1642.

Ancestors of John Richardson Bronson of Attleboro, MA

JOHN RICHARDSON BRONSON, M. D., who for over half a century was one of the best known practitioners of medicine in southern Massachusetts and part of Rhode Island, and who for upward of fifty years was a resident of Attleboro, was a native of Connecticut, born in the town of Middlebury, New Haven county, June 5, 1829, son of Garry and Maria (Richardson) Bronson.

The Bronson family was early planted in the New World. John Bronson (early of record as Brownson and Brunson) was early at Hartford. He is believed, though not certainly known, to have been one of the company who came in 1636 with Mr. Hooker, of whose church he was a member. He was a soldier in the Pequot battle of 1637. He is not named among the proprietors of Hartford in the land division of 1639; but is mentioned in the same year in the list of settlers, who by the “towne’s courtesie” had liberty “to fetch woods and keepe swine or cowes on the common.” His house lot was in the “soldiers’ field,” so called, in the north part of the old village of Hartford, on the “Neck Road” (supposed to have been given for service in the Pequot war), where he lived in 1640. He moved, about 1641 to Tunxis (Farmington) He was deputy from Farmington in May, 1651, and at several subsequent sessions, and the “constable of Farmington” in 1652. He was one of the seven pillars at the organization of the Farmington Church in 1652. His name is on the list of freemen of Farmington in 1669. He died Nov. 28, 1680.

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